Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs

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Rissanen , K , Hölttä , T & Bäck , J 2018 , ' Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs ' , Plant, Cell and Environment , vol. 41 , no. 10 , pp. 2288–2298 . https://doi.org/10.1111/pce.13318

Title: Transpiration directly regulates the emissions of water-soluble short-chained OVOCs
Author: Rissanen, Kaisa; Hölttä, Teemu; Bäck, Jaana
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Ecosystem processes (INAR Forest Sciences)
University of Helsinki, Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS)
University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences
Date: 2018-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Plant, Cell and Environment
ISSN: 0140-7791
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/279380
Abstract: Most plant-based emissions of volatile organic compounds are considered mainly temperature dependent. However, certain oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) have high water solubility; thus, also stomatal conductance could regulate their emissions from shoots. Due to their water solubility and sources in stem and roots, it has also been suggested that their emissions could be affected by transport in the xylem sap. Yet further understanding on the role of transport has been lacking until present. We used shoot-scale long-term dynamic flux data from Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris) to analyse the effects of transpiration and transport in xylem sap flow on emissions of 3 water-soluble OVOCs: methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde. We found a direct effect of transpiration on the shoot emissions of the 3 OVOCs. The emissions were best explained by a regression model that combined linear transpiration and exponential temperature effects. In addition, a structural equation model indicated that stomatal conductance affects emissions mainly indirectly, by regulating transpiration. A part of the temperature's effect is also indirect. The tight coupling of shoot emissions to transpiration clearly evidences that these OVOCs are transported in the xylem sap from their sources in roots and stem to leaves and to ambient air.
Subject: 4112 Forestry
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
acetone
acetaldehyde
long-distance transport
methanol
temperature
xylem sap
ORGANIC-COMPOUND EMISSIONS
SPRUCE PICEA-ABIES
METHANOL EMISSION
VOC EMISSIONS
CO2 EFFLUX
ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS
ACETALDEHYDE EMISSION
BOREAL FOREST
SAP-FLOW
TREES
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