Effects of medially posted insoles on foot and lower limb mechanics across walking and running in overpronating men

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/297796

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Kosonen , J , Kulmala , J-P , Mueller , E & Avela , J 2017 , ' Effects of medially posted insoles on foot and lower limb mechanics across walking and running in overpronating men ' , Journal of Biomechanics , vol. 54 , pp. 58-63 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2017.01.041

Title: Effects of medially posted insoles on foot and lower limb mechanics across walking and running in overpronating men
Author: Kosonen, Jukka; Kulmala, Juha-Pekka; Mueller, Erich; Avela, Janne
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Children's Hospital
Date: 2017-03-21
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Journal of Biomechanics
ISSN: 0021-9290
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/297796
Abstract: Anti-pronation orthoses, like medially posted insoles (MPI), have traditionally been used to treat various of lower limb problems. Yet, we know surprisingly little about their effects on overall foot motion and lower limb mechanics across walking and running, which represent highly different loading conditions. To address this issue, multi-segment foot and lower limb mechanics was examined among 11 over-pronating men with normal (NORM) and MPI insoles during walking (self-selected speed 1.70 +/- 0.19 m/s vs 1.72 +/- 0.20 m/s, respectively) and running (4.04 +/- 0.17 m/s vs 4.10 +/- 0.13 m/s, respectively). The kinematic results showed that MPI reduced the peak forefoot eversion movement in respect to both hindfoot and tibia across walking and running when compared to NORM (p <0.05-0.01). No differences were found in hindfoot eversion between conditions. The kinetic results showed no insole effects in walking, but during running MPI shifted center of pressure medially under the foot (p <0.01) leading to an increase in frontal plane moments at the hip (p <0.05) and knee (p <0.05) joints and a reduction at the ankle joint (p <0.05). These findings indicate that MPI primarily controlled the forefoot motion across walking and running. While kinetic response to MPI was more pronounced in running than walking, kinematic effects were essentially similar across both modes. This suggests that despite higher loads placed upon lower limb during running, there is no need to have a stiffer insoles to achieve similar reduction in the forefoot motion than in walking. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Subject: Medially posted insoles
Walking
Running
Kinetics
Multi-segment foot kinematics
Pronation
ORTHOSES
KINEMATICS
BIOMECHANICS
REARFOOT
ORTHOTICS
KINETICS
MOMENTS
MOTION
ANKLE
KNEE
217 Medical engineering
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