Delayed return of spontaneous circulation (the Lazarus phenomenon) after cessation of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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Kuisma , M , Salo , A , Puolakka , J , Nurmi , J , Kirves , H , Vayrynen , T & Boyd , J 2017 , ' Delayed return of spontaneous circulation (the Lazarus phenomenon) after cessation of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation ' , Resuscitation , vol. 118 , pp. 107-111 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2017.07.022

Title: Delayed return of spontaneous circulation (the Lazarus phenomenon) after cessation of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Author: Kuisma, Markku; Salo, Ari; Puolakka, Jyrki; Nurmi, Jouni; Kirves, Hetti; Vayrynen, Taneli; Boyd, James
Contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Emergency Medicine and Services
University of Helsinki, HUS Emergency Medicine and Services
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, HUS Emergency Medicine and Services
Date: 2017-09
Language: eng
Number of pages: 5
Belongs to series: Resuscitation
ISSN: 0300-9572
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/297928
Abstract: Introduction: The delayed return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), also known as the Lazarus phenomenon, is a rare event described in several case reports. This study aims to determine the incidence and the time of occurrence of the Lazarus phenomenon after cessation of out-of-hospital CPR. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study was conducted in the Helsinki Emergency Medical Service in Finland from 1 January 2011 through 31 December 2016. All out-of-hospital CPR attempts were carefully monitored for 10 min after the cessation of CPR in order to detect delayed ROSC. Results: Altogether, 2102 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurred during the six-year study period. CPR was attempted in 1376 (65.5%) cases. In 840 cases (61.0% of all attempts) CPR attempts were terminated on site. The Lazarus phenomenon occurred five times, with an incidence of 5.95/1000 (95% CI 2.10-14.30) in field-terminated CPR attempts. Time to delayed ROSC from the cessation of CPR varied from 3 to 8 min. Three of the five patients with delayed ROSC died at the scene within 2-15 min while two died later in hospital within 1.5 and 26 h, respectively. Conclusions: We observed that the Lazarus phenomenon is a real albeit rare event and can occur a few minutes after the cessation of out-of-hospital CPR. We suggest a 10-min monitoring period before diagnosing death. CPR guidelines should be updated to include information of the Lazarus phenomenon and appropriate monitoring for it. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Subject: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Death
Lazarus phenomenon
CARDIAC-ARREST
3121 General medicine, internal medicine and other clinical medicine
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
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