Peer Victimization and Academic Performance in Primary School Children

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298121

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Mundy , L K , Canterford , L , Kosola , S , Degenhardt , L , Allen , N B & Patton , G C 2017 , ' Peer Victimization and Academic Performance in Primary School Children ' , Academic Pediatrics , vol. 17 , no. 8 , pp. 830-836 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2017.06.012

Title: Peer Victimization and Academic Performance in Primary School Children
Author: Mundy, Lisa K.; Canterford, Louise; Kosola, Silja; Degenhardt, Louisa; Allen, Nicholas B.; Patton, George C.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Academic Pediatrics
ISSN: 1876-2859
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298121
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Peer victimization is a common antecedent of poor social and emotional adjustment. Its relationship with objectively measured academic performance is unclear. In this study we aimed to quantify the cross-sectional associations between peer victimization and academic performance in a large population sample of children. METHODS: Eight-to 9-year-old children were recruited from a stratified random sample of primary schools in Australia. Academic performance was measured on a national achievement test (1 year of learning equals 40 points). Physical and verbal victimization were measured according to child self-report. RESULTS: Multilevel mixed-effects linear regression analyses were conducted. For female children, verbal victimization was associated with poorer academic performance on writing (beta = 17.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 28.2 to 6.2) and grammar/punctuation (beta = 20.8; 95% CI, 40.1 to 1.6). Physical victimization was associated with poorer performance on numeracy (male children: = 29.0; 95% CI, 53.8 to 4.1; female children: beta = 30.1; 95% CI, 56.6 to 3.5), and writing (female children: beta = -21.5; 95% CI, 40.4 to -2.7). Verbal and physical victimization were associated with poorer performance on reading (male children: beta = -31.5; 95% CI, -59.9 to -3.1; female children: beta = -30.2; 95% CI, -58.6 to -1.8), writing (female children: beta = 25.5; 95% CI, 4-2.8 to -8.2), spelling (female children: beta = -32.3; 95% CI, -59.6 to -4.9), and grammar/punctuation (female children: beta = -32.2; 95% CI, -62.4 to -2.0). CONCLUSIONS: Children who were physically victimized were 6 to 9 months behind their non-victimized peers on measures of academic performance. There are growing reasons for education systems to invest in the prevention of bullying and promotion of positive peer relationships from the earliest years of school.
Subject: bullying
Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS)
education
peer victimization
public health
SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
SOCIAL SUPPORT
ACHIEVEMENT
QUESTIONNAIRE
ASSOCIATIONS
ADOLESCENTS
ADJUSTMENT
BEHAVIORS
STUDENTS
OUTCOMES
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
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