High-alpha band synchronization across frontal, parietal and visual cortex mediates behavioral and neuronal effects of visuospatial attention

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298173

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Lobier , M , Palva , J M & Palva , S 2018 , ' High-alpha band synchronization across frontal, parietal and visual cortex mediates behavioral and neuronal effects of visuospatial attention ' , NeuroImage , vol. 165 , pp. 222-237 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.10.044

Title: High-alpha band synchronization across frontal, parietal and visual cortex mediates behavioral and neuronal effects of visuospatial attention
Author: Lobier, Muriel; Palva, J. Matias; Palva, Satu
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
Date: 2018-01-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 16
Belongs to series: NeuroImage
ISSN: 1053-8119
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298173
Abstract: Visuospatial attention prioritizes processing of attended visual stimuli. It is characterized by lateralized alpha-band (8-14 Hz) amplitude suppression in visual cortex and increased neuronal activity in a network of frontal and parietal areas. It has remained unknown what mechanisms coordinate neuronal processing among frontoparietal network and visual cortices and implement the attention-related modulations of alpha-band amplitudes and behavior. We investigated whether large-scale network synchronization could be such a mechanism. We recorded human cortical activity with magnetoencephalography (MEG) during a visuospatial attention task. We then identified the frequencies and anatomical networks of inter-areal phase synchronization from source localized MEG data. We found that visuospatial attention is associated with robust and sustained long-range synchronization of cortical oscillations exclusively in the high-alpha (10-14 Hz) frequency band. This synchronization connected frontal, parietal and visual regions and was observed concurrently with amplitude suppression of low-alpha (6-9 Hz) band oscillations in visual cortex. Furthermore, stronger high-alpha phase synchronization was associated with decreased reaction times to attended stimuli and larger suppression of alpha-band amplitudes. These results thus show that high-alpha band phase synchronization is functionally significant and could coordinate the neuronal communication underlying the implementation of visuospatial attention.
Subject: MEG
Attention
Synchronization
Oscillations
Alpha
SPATIAL ATTENTION
BRAIN NETWORKS
GAMMA OSCILLATIONS
TOP-DOWN
EEG
MODULATION
MECHANISMS
RHYTHMS
PERCEPTION
FREQUENCY
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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