Calcium in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis : EMAS clinical guide

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Cano , A , Chedraui , P , Goulis , D G , Lopes , P , Mishra , G , Mueck , A , Senturk , L M , Simoncini , T , Stevenson , J C , Stute , P , Tuomikoski , P , Rees , M & Lambrinoudaki , I 2018 , ' Calcium in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis : EMAS clinical guide ' , Maturitas , vol. 107 , pp. 7-12 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.10.004

Title: Calcium in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis : EMAS clinical guide
Author: Cano, Antonio; Chedraui, Peter; Goulis, Dimitrios G.; Lopes, Patrice; Mishra, Gita; Mueck, Alfred; Senturk, Levent M.; Simoncini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C.; Stute, Petra; Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Rees, Margaret; Lambrinoudaki, Irene
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2018-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Maturitas
ISSN: 0378-5122
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298242
Abstract: Introduction: Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a highly prevalent disease. Prevention through lifestyle measures includes an adequate calcium intake. Despite the guidance provided by scientific societies and governmental bodies worldwide, many issues remain unresolved. Aims: To provide evidence regarding the impact of calcium intake on the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and critically appraise current guidelines. Materials and methods: Literature review and consensus of expert opinion. Results and conclusion: The recommended daily intake of calcium varies between 700 and 1200 mg of elemental calcium, depending on the endorsing source. Although calcium can be derived either from the diet or supplements, the former source is preferred. Intake below the recommended amount may increase fragility fracture risk; however, there is no consistent evidence that calcium supplementation at, or above, recommended levels reduces risk. The addition of vitamin D may minimally reduce fractures, mainly among institutionalised people. Excessive intake of calcium, defined as higher than 2000 mg/day, can be potentially harmful. Some studies demonstrated harm even at lower dosages. An increased risk for cardiovascular events, urolithiasis and even fractures has been found in association with excessive calcium intake, but this issue remains unresolved. In conclusion, an adequate intake of calcium is recommended for general bone health. Excessive calcium intake seems of no benefit, and could possibly be harmful.
Subject: Calcium
Postmenopausal osteoporosis
Prevention
Diet
Excess-calcium risk
VITAMIN-D SUPPLEMENTATION
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
SYMPTOMATIC KIDNEY-STONES
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
DIETARY CALCIUM
SERUM-CALCIUM
UPDATED METAANALYSIS
FRACTURE PREVENTION
DAIRY-PRODUCTS
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
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