Childhood adversities and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298799

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Lindgren , M , Mäntylä , T , Rikandi , E , Torniainen-Holm , M , Morales-Munoz , I , Kieseppä , T , Mantere , O & Suvisaari , J 2017 , ' Childhood adversities and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis ' , Psychiatry Research , vol. 258 , pp. 374-381 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.070

Title: Childhood adversities and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis
Author: Lindgren, Maija; Mäntylä, Teemu; Rikandi, Eva; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Morales-Munoz, Isabel; Kieseppä, Tuula; Mantere, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychiatry
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
Date: 2017-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Psychiatry Research
ISSN: 0165-1781
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/298799
Abstract: In addition to severe traumatic experiences, milder, more common childhood adversities reflecting psychosocial burden may also be common in people with psychotic disorders and have an effect on symptomatology and functioning. We explored eleven negative childhood experiences and their influence on clinical symptoms among young adults with first-episode psychosis (FEP, n = 75) and matched population controls (n = 51). Individuals with FEP reported more adversities than controls. Specifically serious conflicts within the family, bullying at school, maternal mental health problems, and one's own and parents' serious illness during childhood were experienced by the patients more often than by controls. In the FEP group, the severity of adversity was associated with increased anxiety, manic, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but not with the severity of positive psychotic symptoms. Adversity produced a more pronounced effect on symptoms in male patients than in female patients. To conclude, in line with earlier studies of more chronic psychosis, a majority of the participants with FEP reported exposure to childhood adversities, with the FEP group reporting more adversities than controls. High levels of mood and anxiety symptoms in patients with FEP may be related to cumulative exposure to childhood adversities. This should be taken into account in the treatment for FEP.
Subject: BORDERLINE PERSONALITY-DISORDER
OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
BULLYING VICTIMIZATION
BIPOLAR DISORDER
MENTAL-HEALTH
EARLY ADULTHOOD
TRAUMA
RISK
SCHIZOPHRENIA
SYMPTOMS
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
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