Longitudinal two-photon imaging in somatosensory cortex of behaving mice reveals dendritic spine formation enhancement by subchronic administration of low-dose ketamine

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Pryazhnikov , E , Mugantseva , E , Casarotto , P , Kolikova , J , Fred , S M , Toptunov , D , Afzalov , R , Hotulainen , P , Voikar , V , Terry-Lorenzo , R , Engel , S , Kirov , S , Castren , E & Khiroug , L 2018 , ' Longitudinal two-photon imaging in somatosensory cortex of behaving mice reveals dendritic spine formation enhancement by subchronic administration of low-dose ketamine ' , Scientific Reports , vol. 8 , 6464 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24933-8

Title: Longitudinal two-photon imaging in somatosensory cortex of behaving mice reveals dendritic spine formation enhancement by subchronic administration of low-dose ketamine
Author: Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Mugantseva, Ekaterina; Casarotto, Plinio; Kolikova, Julia; Fred, Senem Merve; Toptunov, Dmytro; Afzalov, Ramil; Hotulainen, Pirta; Voikar, Vootele; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Engel, Sharon; Kirov, Sergei; Castren, Eero; Khiroug, Leonard
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Helsinki In Vivo Animal Imaging Platform (HAIP)


Date: 2018-04-24
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24933-8
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/299100
Abstract: Ketamine, a well-known anesthetic, has recently attracted renewed attention as a fast-acting antidepressant. A single dose of ketamine induces rapid synaptogenesis, which may underlie its antidepressant effect. To test whether repeated exposure to ketamine triggers sustained synaptogenesis, we administered a sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine (10 mg/kg i.p.) once-daily for 5 days, and repeatedly imaged dendritic spines of the YFP-expressing pyramidal neurons in somatosensory cortex of awake female mice using in vivo two-photon microscopy. We found that the spine formation rate became significantly higher at 72-132 h after the first ketamine injection (but not at 6-24 h), while the rate of elimination of pre-existing spines remained unchanged. In contrast to the net gain of spines observed in ketamine-treated mice, the vehicle-injected control mice exhibited a net loss typical for young-adult animals undergoing synapse pruning. Ketamine-induced spinogenesis was correlated with increased PSD-95 and phosphorylated actin, consistent with formation of new synapses. Moreover, structural synaptic plasticity caused by ketamine was paralleled by a significant improvement in the nest building behavioral assay. Taken together, our data show that subchronic low-dose ketamine induces a sustained shift towards spine formation.
Subject: RESISTANT MAJOR DEPRESSION
SYNAPSE FORMATION
IN-VIVO
RECEPTORS
MATURATION
PHENCYCLIDINE
METABOLITES
PLASTICITY
BRAIN
3112 Neurosciences
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