The role of study engagement in university students' daily experiences : A multilevel test of moderation

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Ketonen , E E , Malmberg , L-E , Salmela-Aro , K , Muukkonen , H , Tuominen , H & Lonka , K 2019 , ' The role of study engagement in university students' daily experiences : A multilevel test of moderation ' , Learning and Individual Differences , vol. 69 , pp. 196-205 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2018.11.001

Title: The role of study engagement in university students' daily experiences : A multilevel test of moderation
Author: Ketonen, Elina E.; Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Muukkonen, Hanni; Tuominen, Heta; Lonka, Kirsti
Contributor organization: Department of Education
Centre for Educational Assessment CEA
Education of Education
Motivation, learning, and well-being
Minds Hub
Research Group for Educational Psychology
Teachers' Academy
Date: 2019-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Learning and Individual Differences
ISSN: 1041-6080
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2018.11.001
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/300051
Abstract: The present study investigated the dynamic nature of students' daily experiences and general study engagement using intra-individual assessment. More specifically, we examined individual differences in the relationship between university students' task-specific value and situational emotions and, further, whether first-year study engagement would moderate this association during the first two years of studies. Intra-individual state assessments were conducted via mobile phone-based experience sampling method (ESM) during participants' first (N = 72) and second (N = 56) academic years, resulting in 3089 and 2912 fully completed state questionnaires. In both years, students were asked five times a day over two weeks how important they perceived their current activity and their positive and negative emotions. Using multilevel structural equation modeling, we found that, on average, a higher perception of task-specific value was associated with higher positive emotions and lower negative emotions within individuals. However, individual differences were detected in the value-emotion relations especially during the second academic year. Finally, the findings indicated that overall study engagement, measured at the beginning of the first academic year, predicted between-person differences in these within-person relationships both years.
Subject: Study engagement
Daily experiences
Task-specific value
Situational emotions
University students
School engagement
Academic emotions
Success
Burnout
Achievement
Antecedents
Performance
Profiles
Context
Goals
516 Educational sciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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