Postglacial colonization history reflects in the genetic structure of natural populations of Festuca rubra in Europe

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/300804

Citation

von Cräutlein , M , Leinonen , P H , Korpelainen , H , Helander , M , Väre , H & Saikkonen , K 2019 , ' Postglacial colonization history reflects in the genetic structure of natural populations of Festuca rubra in Europe ' , Ecology and Evolution , vol. 9 , no. 6 , pp. 3661-3674 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.4997

Title: Postglacial colonization history reflects in the genetic structure of natural populations of Festuca rubra in Europe
Author: von Cräutlein, Maria; Leinonen, Päivi H.; Korpelainen, Helena; Helander, Marjo; Väre, Henry; Saikkonen, Kari
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences
University of Helsinki, Department of Agricultural Sciences
University of Helsinki, Botany
Date: 2019-03-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Ecology and Evolution
ISSN: 2045-7758
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/300804
Abstract: We conducted a large-scale population genetic survey of genetic diversity of the host grass Festuca rubra s.l., which fitness can be highly dependent on its symbiotic fungus Epichloe festucae, to evaluate genetic variation and population structure across the European range. The 27 studied populations have previously been found to differ in frequencies of occurrence of the symbiotic fungus E. festucae and ploidy levels. As predicted, we found decreased genetic diversity in previously glaciated areas in comparison with nonglaciated regions and discovered three major maternal genetic groups: southern, northeastern, and northwestern Europe. Interestingly, host populations from Greenland were genetically similar to those from the Faroe Islands and Iceland, suggesting gene flow also between those areas. The level of variation among populations within regions is evidently highly dependent on the postglacial colonization history, in particular on the number of independent long-distance seed colonization events. Yet, also anthropogenic effects may have affected the population structure in F. rubra. We did not observe higher fungal infection rates in grass populations with lower levels of genetic variability. In fact, the fungal infection rates of E. festucae in relation to genetic variability of the host populations varied widely among geographical areas, which indicate differences in population histories due to colonization events and possible costs of systemic fungi in harsh environmental conditions. We found that the plants of different ploidy levels are genetically closely related within geographic areas indicating independent formation of polyploids in different maternal lineages.
Subject: CpDNA
Epichloë festucae
Festuca rubra
genetic structure
postglacial colonization history
symbiotic microbes
CHLOROPLAST MICROSATELLITES
NORTHERN
Epichloe festucae
DISPERSAL
ENDOPHYTE EPICHLOE-FESTUCAE
DNA HAPLOTYPES
GLACIAL SURVIVAL
CONSEQUENCES
DIVERSITY
POLYPLOIDY
FUNGAL ENDOPHYTES
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
4111 Agronomy
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Cr_utlein_et_al_2019_Ecology_and_Evolution.pdf 819.0Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record