Development of Late Circadian Preference : Sleep Timing From Childhood to Late Adolescence

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301087

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Kuula , L , Pesonen , A-K , Merikanto , I , Gradisar , M , Lahti , J , Heinonen , K , Kajantie , E & Räikkönen , K 2018 , ' Development of Late Circadian Preference : Sleep Timing From Childhood to Late Adolescence ' , The Journal of Pediatrics , vol. 194 , pp. 182-+ . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.068

Title: Development of Late Circadian Preference : Sleep Timing From Childhood to Late Adolescence
Author: Kuula, Liisa; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Merikanto, Ilona; Gradisar, Michael; Lahti, Jari; Heinonen, Kati; Kajantie, Eero; Räikkönen, Katri
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Medicum
University of Helsinki, Lastentautien yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Medicum
Date: 2018-03
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: The Journal of Pediatrics
ISSN: 0022-3476
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301087
Abstract: Objectives To assess differences relating to circadian preference in objectively measured sleep patterns from childhood to adolescence over a 9-year period. We hypothesized there is developmental continuity in sleep timing and duration according to circadian preference. Study design Young participants (N = 111, 65% girls) from a community- based birth cohort underwent sleep actigraphy at mean ages 8.1 (SD = 0.3), 12.3 (SD = 0.5), and 16.9 (SD = 0.1) years. A short version of MorningnessEveningness Questionnaire was administered in late adolescence. At each follow-up, sleep midpoint, duration, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, and weekend catch-up sleep were compared between those reporting morning, intermediate, and evening preferences in late adolescence. Results Mixed model analyses indicated that sleep timing was significantly earlier among morning types compared with evening types at all ages (P values <.04). The mean differences in sleep midpoint between morning and evening types increased from a mean of 19 minutes (age 8), 36 minutes (age 12), to 89 minutes (age 17). The largest change occurred from age 12 to 17 years. Sleep duration, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, and catch-up sleep did not differ according to circadian preference. Conclusions This study found significant continuity in sleep timing from childhood to adolescence over 9 years, indicating that late circadian preference reported in late adolescence begins to manifest in middle childhood. Further studies are needed to establish whether sleep timing has its origins at an even earlier age.
Subject: POOR SLEEP
CHRONOTYPE
DURATION
QUALITY
RHYTHMS
TIME
RISK
515 Psychology
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