The first draft genomes of the ant Formica exsecta, and its Wolbachia endosymbiont reveal extensive gene transfer from endosymbiont to host

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dc.contributor.author Dhaygude, Kishor
dc.contributor.author Nair, Abhilash
dc.contributor.author Johansson, Helena
dc.contributor.author Wurm, Yannick
dc.contributor.author Sundström, Liselotte
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-21T03:18:18Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-21T03:18:18Z
dc.date.issued 2019-04-16
dc.identifier.citation BMC Genomics. 2019 Apr 16;20(1):301
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301102
dc.description.abstract Abstract Background Adapting to changes in the environment is the foundation of species survival, and is usually thought to be a gradual process. However, transposable elements (TEs), epigenetic modifications, and/or genetic material acquired from other organisms by means of horizontal gene transfer (HGTs), can also lead to novel adaptive traits. Social insects form dense societies, which attract and maintain extra- and intracellular accessory inhabitants, which may facilitate gene transfer between species. The wood ant Formica exsecta (Formicidae; Hymenoptera), is a common ant species throughout the Palearctic region. The species is a well-established model for studies of ecological characteristics and evolutionary conflict. Results In this study, we sequenced and assembled draft genomes for F. exsecta and its endosymbiont Wolbachia. The F. exsecta draft genome is 277.7 Mb long; we identify 13,767 protein coding genes, for which we provide gene ontology and protein domain annotations. This is also the first report of a Wolbachia genome from ants, and provides insights into the phylogenetic position of this endosymbiont. We also identified multiple horizontal gene transfer events (HGTs) from Wolbachia to F. exsecta. Some of these HGTs have also occurred in parallel in multiple other insect genomes, highlighting the extent of HGTs in eukaryotes. Conclusion We present the first draft genome of ant F. exsecta, and its endosymbiont Wolbachia (wFex), and show considerable rates of gene transfer from the symbiont to the host. We expect that especially the F. exsecta genome will be valuable resource in further exploration of the molecular basis of the evolution of social organization.
dc.publisher BioMed Central
dc.subject Formica exsecta
dc.subject Genome
dc.subject Endosymbionts
dc.subject Transposons
dc.subject Horizontal gene transfer
dc.subject Wolbachia
dc.title The first draft genomes of the ant Formica exsecta, and its Wolbachia endosymbiont reveal extensive gene transfer from endosymbiont to host
dc.date.updated 2019-04-21T03:18:18Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en
dc.rights.holder The Author(s).
dc.type.uri http://purl.org/eprint/entityType/ScholarlyWork
dc.type.uri http://purl.org/eprint/entityType/Expression
dc.type.uri http://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticle

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