High Pregnancy, Cord Blood, and Infant Vitamin D Concentrations May Predict Slower Infant Growth

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301119

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Hauta-alus , H H , Kajantie , E , Holmlund-Suila , E M , Rosendahl , J , Valkama , S M , Enlund-Cerullo , M , Helve , O M , Hytinantti , T K , Viljakainen , H , Andersson , S & Mäkitie , O 2019 , ' High Pregnancy, Cord Blood, and Infant Vitamin D Concentrations May Predict Slower Infant Growth ' , Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism , vol. 104 , no. 2 , pp. 397-407 . https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2018-00602

Title: High Pregnancy, Cord Blood, and Infant Vitamin D Concentrations May Predict Slower Infant Growth
Author: Hauta-alus, Helena H.; Kajantie, Eero; Holmlund-Suila, Elisa M.; Rosendahl, Jenni; Valkama, Saara M.; Enlund-Cerullo, Maria; Helve, Otto M.; Hytinantti, Timo K.; Viljakainen, Heli; Andersson, Sture; Mäkitie, Outi
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Children's Hospital
University of Helsinki, Lastentautien yksikkö
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Children's Hospital
University of Helsinki, Children's Hospital
University of Helsinki, Department of Food and Nutrition
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
University of Helsinki, Lastentautien yksikkö
Date: 2019-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
ISSN: 0021-972X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301119
Abstract: Context: The relationship of maternal and infant 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration [25(OH)D] with infant growth is unclear. Objective: Our objective was to explore whether 25(OH)D in pregnancy, umbilical cord blood (UCB), or in infancy was associated with infant growth. Design: This study involved 798 healthy infants and their mothers in Finland. We assessed 25(OH)D during pregnancy, from UCB at birth, and from the infant at the age of 12 months. Main Outcome Measures: Infant length, weight, length-adjusted weight, and head circumference at 6 and 12 months and midupper-arm circumference at 12 months. Results: Of the mothers and infants, 96% and 99% were vitamin D sufficient [25(OH)D >= 50 nmol/L], respectively. Mothers with pregnancy 25(OH)D >125 nmol/L had the shortest, lightest (in weight), and thinnest (in length-adjusted weight) infants at 6 months (P for all <0.05). For each 10 nmol/L higher UCB 25(OH)D, the infants were 0.03 SD score (SDS) shorter at 6 months (95% CI -0.05 to -0.01), adjusted for birth size, infant 25(OH)D, and parental height. Higher UCB 25(OH)D associated with smaller head circumference at 6 and 12 months (P for all 125 nmol/L had the thinnest infants at 12 months (P = 0.021). For each 10 nmol/L higher infant 25(OH)D, the infants were 0.03 SDS lighter (-0.05 to -0.01) and 0.03 SDS thinner (-0.05 to 0.00) at 12 months. Conclusions: Our results suggest that high pregnancy, cord blood, and infant vitamin D concentration may have disadvantageous effects on infant growth.
Subject: 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D CONCENTRATION
D SUPPLEMENTATION
D INTERVENTION
D DEFICIENCY
FOLLOW-UP
ASSOCIATION
HEALTHY
FETAL
AGE
PREVENTION
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
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