Joint species movement modeling : how do traits influence movements?

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Ovaskainen , O , Ramos , D L , Slade , E M , Merckx , T , Tikhonov , G , Pennanen , J , Pizo , M A , Ribeiro , M C & Manuel Morales , J 2019 , ' Joint species movement modeling : how do traits influence movements? ' , Ecology , vol. 100 , no. 4 , 02622 . https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2622

Title: Joint species movement modeling : how do traits influence movements?
Author: Ovaskainen, Otso; Ramos, Danielle Leal; Slade, Eleanor M.; Merckx, Thomas; Tikhonov, Gleb; Pennanen, Juho; Pizo, Marco Aurelio; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar; Manuel Morales, Juan
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme


Date: 2019-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Ecology
ISSN: 0012-9658
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2622
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301236
Abstract: Joint species distribution modeling has enabled researchers to move from species-level to community-level analyses, leading to statistically more efficient and ecologically more informative use of data. Here, we propose joint species movement modeling (JSMM) as an analogous approach that enables inferring both species- and community-level movement parameters from multispecies movement data. The species-level movement parameters are modeled as a function of species traits and phylogenetic relationships, allowing one to ask how species traits influence movements, and whether phylogenetically related species are similar in their movement behavior. We illustrate the modeling framework with two contrasting case studies: a stochastic redistribution model for direct observations of bird movements and a spatially structured diffusion model for capture-recapture data on moth movements. In both cases, the JSMM identified several traits that explain differences in movement behavior among species, such as movement rate increasing with body size in both birds and moths. We show with simulations that the JSMM approach increases precision of species-specific parameter estimates by borrowing information from other species that are closely related or have similar traits. The JSMM framework is applicable for many kinds of data, and it facilitates a mechanistic understanding of the causes and consequences of interspecific variation in movement behavior.
Subject: birds
community model
hierarchical model
joint species model
moths
movement model
statistical model
ANIMAL MOVEMENT
DISPERSAL ABILITY
RANGE SIZE
POPULATION
BUTTERFLIES
LANDSCAPE
FRAMEWORK
PATTERNS
DISTANCE
ECOLOGY
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
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