Soil Organic Carbon Content and Microbial Functional Diversity Were Lower in Monospecific Chinese Hickory Stands than in Natural Chinese Hickory–Broad-Leaved Mixed Forests

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Wu, W.; Lin, H.; Fu, W.; Penttinen, P.; Li, Y.; Jin, J.; Zhao, K.; Wu, J. Soil Organic Carbon Content and Microbial Functional Diversity Were Lower in Monospecific Chinese Hickory Stands than in Natural Chinese Hickory–Broad-Leaved Mixed Forests. Forests 2019, 10, 357.

Title: Soil Organic Carbon Content and Microbial Functional Diversity Were Lower in Monospecific Chinese Hickory Stands than in Natural Chinese Hickory–Broad-Leaved Mixed Forests
Author: Wu, Weifeng; Lin, Haiping; Fu, Weijun; Penttinen, Petri; Li, Yongfu; Jin, Jin; Zhao, Keli; Wu, Jiasen
Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Date: 2019-04-25
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301331
Abstract: To assess the effects of long-term intensive management on soil carbon cycle and microbial functional diversity, we sampled soil in Chinese hickory (<i>Carya cathayensis</i> Sarg.) stands managed intensively for 5, 10, 15, and 20 years, and in reference Chinese hickory&ndash;broad-leaved mixed forest (NMF) stands. We analyzed soil total organic carbon (TOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) contents, applied <sup>13</sup>C-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis for structural analysis, and determined microbial carbon source usage. TOC, MBC, and WSOC contents and the MBC to TOC ratios were lower in the intensively managed stands than in the NMF stands. The organic carbon pool in the stands managed intensively for twenty years was more stable, indicating that the easily degraded compounds had been decomposed. Diversity and evenness in carbon source usage by the microbial communities were lower in the stands managed intensively for 15 and 20 years. Based on carbon source usage, the longer the management time, the less similar the samples from the monospecific Chinese hickory stands were with the NMF samples, indicating that the microbial community compositions became more different with increased management time. The results call for changes in the management of the hickory stands to increase the soil carbon content and restore microbial diversity.


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