Adenovirus flow in host cell networks

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301769

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Flatt , J W & Butcher , S J 2019 , ' Adenovirus flow in host cell networks ' , Open biology , vol. 9 , no. 2 , 190012 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rsob.190012

Title: Adenovirus flow in host cell networks
Author: Flatt, Justin W.; Butcher, Sarah J.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Macromolecular structure and function
University of Helsinki, Molecular and Integrative Biosciences Research Programme
Date: 2019-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Open biology
ISSN: 2046-2441
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/301769
Abstract: Viruses are obligatory parasites that take advantage of intracellular niches to replicate. During infection, their genomes are carried in capsids across the membranes of host cells to sites of virion production by exploiting cellular behaviour and resources to guide and achieve all aspects of delivery and the downstream virus manufacturing process. Successful entry hinges on execution of a precisely tuned viral uncoating program where incoming capsids disassemble in consecutive steps to ensure that genomes are released at the right time, and in the right place for replication to occur. Each step of disassembly is cell-assisted, involving individual pathways that transmit signals to regulate discrete functions, but at the same time, these signalling pathways are organized into larger networks, which communicate back and forth in complex ways in response to the presence of virus. In this review, we consider the elegant strategy by which adenoviruses (AdVs) target and navigate cellular networks to initiate the production of progeny virions. There are many remarkable aspects about the AdV entry program; for example, the virus gains targeted control of a large well-defined local network neighbourhood by coupling several interacting processes (including endocytosis, autophagy and microtubule trafficking) around a collective reference state centred on the interactional topology and multifunctional nature of protein VI. Understanding the network targeting activity of protein VI, as well as other built-in mechanisms that allow AdV particles to be efficient at navigating the subsystems of the cell, can be used to improve viral vectors, but also has potential to be incorporated for use in entirely novel delivery systems.
Subject: adenovirus
infection
cell networks
virus entry
capsid
uncoating
NUCLEAR-PORE COMPLEX
MEMBRANE PENETRATION
INNATE IMMUNITY
ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY
CYTOPLASMIC DYNEIN
VIRUS ENTRY
SIALIC-ACID
PROTEIN
RECEPTOR
TRANSPORT
1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology
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