Atmospheric Circulation Response to Anomalous Siberian Forcing in October 2016 and its Long‐Range Predictability

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/302088

Citation

Tyrrell , N L , Karpechko , A Y , Uotila , P & Vihma , T 2019 , ' Atmospheric Circulation Response to Anomalous Siberian Forcing in October 2016 and its Long‐Range Predictability ' , Geophysical Research Letters , vol. 46 , no. 5 , pp. 2800-2810 . https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GL081580

Title: Atmospheric Circulation Response to Anomalous Siberian Forcing in October 2016 and its Long‐Range Predictability
Author: Tyrrell, Nicholas L.; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.; Uotila, Petteri; Vihma, Timo
Contributor: University of Helsinki, INAR Physics
Date: 2019-03-16
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Geophysical Research Letters
ISSN: 0094-8276
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/302088
Abstract: Abstract: The warm Arctic-cold continent pattern was of record strength in October 2016, providing the opportunity to test its proposed influence on large-scale atmospheric circulation. We find a record weak polar stratospheric vortex and negative North Atlantic Oscillation in November-December 2016 and link them to increased planetary wave generation associated with cold Siberian anomalies followed by troposphere-stratosphere dynamical coupling. At the same time the warm Arctic anomalies, in particular those over the Barents-Kara Seas, do not appear to play an important role in forcing the atmospheric circulation. Long-range forecasts initialized on 1 October 2016 reproduced both the weak polar vortex and negative North Atlantic Oscillation, as well as their link with the Siberian temperatures. Our results support the stratospheric pathway for atmospheric circulation forcing associated with Siberian surface anomalies and uncover a source of skill for subseasonal forecasts from October to December. Plain Language Summary: The warm Arctic-cold continent pattern is an observed, large-scale pattern of near-surface temperatures where the Arctic is warmer than average and Siberia is colder than average. This pattern was of record strength in October 2016, providing the opportunity to test its influence on the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation and the possibility of skillful long-range forecasts. It has been proposed that the warm Arctic-cold continent pattern can drive large atmospheric waves, which are able to travel from the troposphere into the stratosphere, where they weaken the strong wintertime winds that make up the stratospheric polar vortex. A weakened polar vortex can then lead to changes in the surface pressure that can affect weather patterns. We find a record weak polar stratospheric vortex in late autumn 2016 and link that to cold Siberian anomalies. At the same time the warm Arctic anomalies do not appear to play an important role in forcing the atmospheric circulation. Long-range forecasts initialized in October 2016 reproduced both the weak polar vortex and resulting surface pressure patterns. Our results support the stratospheric pathway for atmospheric circulation forcing by Siberian surface anomalies and uncover a source of skill for subseasonal forecasts in the Northern Hemisphere autumn.
Subject: ARCTIC SEA-ICE
CLIMATE
LINKS
MECHANISMS
SNOW COVER VARIABILITY
STRATOSPHERE
Siberian forcing
WAVE ACTIVITY FLUX
WINTER
autumn 2016
polar vortex
seasonal forecasting
stratosphere-troposphere
1172 Environmental sciences
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Tyrrell_et_al_2 ... sical_Research_Letters.pdf 1.783Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record