The effect of body mass index on smoking behaviour and nicotine metabolism : a Mendelian randomization study

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Taylor , A E , Richmond , R C , Palviainen , T , Loukola , A , Wootton , R E , Kaprio , J , Relton , C L , Smith , G D & Munafo , M R 2019 , ' The effect of body mass index on smoking behaviour and nicotine metabolism : a Mendelian randomization study ' , Human Molecular Genetics , vol. 28 , no. 8 , pp. 1322-1330 . https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddy434

Title: The effect of body mass index on smoking behaviour and nicotine metabolism : a Mendelian randomization study
Author: Taylor, Amy E.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Palviainen, Teemu; Loukola, Anu; Wootton, Robyn E.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Relton, Caroline L.; Smith, George Davey; Munafo, Marcus R.
Contributor organization: Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
Helsinki Institute of Life Science HiLIFE
HUSLAB
Department of Public Health
Clinicum
Genetic Epidemiology
Date: 2019-04-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Human Molecular Genetics
ISSN: 0964-6906
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddy434
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/303472
Abstract: Given clear evidence that smoking lowers weight, it is possible that individuals with higher body mass index (BMI) smoke in order to lose or maintain their weight. We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses of the effects of BMI on smoking behaviour in UK Biobank and the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium genome-wide association study (GWAS), on cotinine levels and nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) in published GWAS and on DNA methylation in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Our results indicate that higher BMI causally influences lifetime smoking, smoking initiation, smoking heaviness and also DNA methylation at the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) locus, but we do not see evidence for an effect on smoking cessation. While there is no strong evidence that BMI causally influences cotinine levels, suggestive evidence for a negative causal influence on NMR may explain this. There is a causal effect of BMI on smoking, but the relationship is likely to be complex due to opposing effects on behaviour and metabolism.
Subject: WEIGHT CONTROL BEHAVIORS
CIGARETTE-SMOKING
COTININE LEVELS
CESSATION
DISSATISFACTION
ASSOCIATIONS
OBESITY
GAIN
BIAS
1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology
1184 Genetics, developmental biology, physiology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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