Systems Biology Approach Pinpoints Minimum Requirements for Auxin Distribution during Fruit Opening : Plant Systems Biology

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/303771

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Li , X-R , Vroomans , R M A , Fox , S , Grieneisen , V A , Østergaard , L & Marée , A F M 2019 , ' Systems Biology Approach Pinpoints Minimum Requirements for Auxin Distribution during Fruit Opening : Plant Systems Biology ' , Molecular Plant , vol. 12 , no. 6 , pp. 863-878 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molp.2019.05.003

Title: Systems Biology Approach Pinpoints Minimum Requirements for Auxin Distribution during Fruit Opening : Plant Systems Biology
Author: Li, Xin-Ran; Vroomans, Renske M.A.; Fox, Samantha; Grieneisen, Verônica A.; Østergaard, Lars; Marée, Athanasius F.M.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Institute of Biotechnology
Date: 2019-06-03
Language: eng
Number of pages: 16
Belongs to series: Molecular Plant
ISSN: 1674-2052
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/303771
Abstract: The phytohormone auxin is implied in steering various developmental decisions during plant morphogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner. Auxin maxima have been shown to maintain meristematic activity, for example, of the root apical meristem, and position new sites of outgrowth, such as during lateral root initiation and phyllotaxis. More recently, it has been demonstrated that sites of auxin minima also provide positional information. In the developing Arabidopsis fruit, auxin minima are required for correct differentiation of the valve margin. It remains unclear, however, how this auxin minimum is generated and maintained. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to model auxin transport based on experimental observations. This allows us to determine the minimal requirements for its establishment. Our simulations reveal that two alternative processes—which we coin “flux-barrier” and “flux-passage”—are both able to generate an auxin minimum, but under different parameter settings. Both models are in principle able to yield similar auxin profiles but present qualitatively distinct patterns of auxin flux. The models were tested by tissue-specific inducible ablation, revealing that the auxin minimum in the fruit is most likely generated by a flux-passage process. Model predictions were further supported through 3D PIN localization imaging and implementing experimentally observed transporter localization. Through such an experimental–modeling cycle, we predict how the auxin minimum gradually matures during fruit development to ensure timely fruit opening and seed dispersal.
Subject: auxin
mathematical modeling
polar auxin transport
fruit development
systems biology of patterning
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
1182 Biochemistry, cell and molecular biology
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