Population Dynamics at the Range Margin : Implications of Climate Change on Sublittoral Blue Mussels (Mytilus trossulus)

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/304287

Citation

Westerbom , M , Mustonen , O , Jaatinen , K , Kilpi , M & Norkko , A 2019 , ' Population Dynamics at the Range Margin : Implications of Climate Change on Sublittoral Blue Mussels (Mytilus trossulus) ' , Frontiers in Marine Science , vol. 6 , 292 . https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00292

Title: Population Dynamics at the Range Margin : Implications of Climate Change on Sublittoral Blue Mussels (Mytilus trossulus)
Author: Westerbom, Mats; Mustonen, Olli; Jaatinen, Kim; Kilpi, Mikael; Norkko, Alf
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Tvärminne Zoological Station
University of Helsinki, Tvärminne Zoological Station
University of Helsinki, Tvärminne Zoological Station
University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
Date: 2019-06-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: Frontiers in Marine Science
ISSN: 2296-7745
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/304287
Abstract: Examining changes in abundance and demographic rates at species distribution margins may provide the first signs of broader species responses to environmental change. Still, the joint impact of space and time have remained relatively unstudied in most marginal regions. In order to examine the influence of climate variability on mussel distribution patterns, we monitored three sublittoral and marginal blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus) populations, spaced along a salinity gradient. Densities and biomasses peaked toward the saltier parts of the study area and showed relatively larger variations toward the low saline edge. Temporally, the areas showed a consistent increase in abundance after a synchronized large-scale recruitment event, which was followed by a decline in population size, occurring much faster toward the very range edge. Salinity, temperature, winter severity, and wave exposure explained most of the spatiotemporal variation in mussel abundances and adults showed positive effects on recruit abundance. We show empirically that the dynamics of edge populations are not driven by large changes in climate variables but that small spatial and temporal changes in key environmental variables have large and non-linear population level effects. Our results also show that fluctuating recruitment is a key factor for population stability affecting the storage potential of marginal populations, which dramatically decrease toward the edge. Our study provides a window into future population patterns and processes that drive marginal mussel populations in an altered sea characterized by rising temperature and declining salinity.
Subject: climate variability
environmental gradient
edge of the range
estuarine
rocky shore
synchronized recruitment
monitoring
central-marginal hypothesis
SPATIAL SYNCHRONY
BALTIC SEA
NORTH-SEA
EDULIS
RECRUITMENT
SHIFTS
LIMITS
ABUNDANCE
IMPACTS
DRIVEN
1172 Environmental sciences
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
fmars_06_00292.pdf 1.516Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record