Trees in urban parks and forests reduce O3, but not NO2 concentrations in Baltimore, MD, USA

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/304471

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Yli-Pelkonen , V J , Scott , A A , Viippola , J V & Setälä , H M 2017 , ' Trees in urban parks and forests reduce O3, but not NO2 concentrations in Baltimore, MD, USA ' , Atmospheric Environment , vol. 167 , pp. 73-80 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.08.020

Title: Trees in urban parks and forests reduce O3, but not NO2 concentrations in Baltimore, MD, USA
Author: Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa Johannes; Scott, Anna A.; Viippola, Juho Viljami; Setälä, Heikki Martti
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
Date: 2017-08-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Atmospheric Environment
ISSN: 1352-2310
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/304471
Abstract: Trees and other vegetation absorb and capture air pollutants, leading to the common perception that they, and trees in particular, can improve air quality in cities and provide an important ecosystem service for urban inhabitants. Yet, there has been a lack of empirical evidence showing this at the local scale with different plant configurations and climatic regions. We studied the impact of urban park and forest vegetation on the levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ground-level ozone (O3) while controlling for temperature during early summer (May) using passive samplers in Baltimore, USA. Concentrations of O3 were significantly lower in tree-covered habitats than in adjacent open habitats, but concentrations of NO2 did not differ significantly between tree-covered and open habitats. Higher temperatures resulted in higher pollutant concentrations and NO2 and O3 concentration were negatively correlated with each other. Our results suggest that the role of trees in reducing NO2 concentrations in urban parks and forests in the Mid-Atlantic USA is minor, but that the presence of tree-cover can result in lower O3 levels compared to similar open areas. Our results further suggest that actions aiming at local air pollution mitigation should consider local variability in vegetation, climate, micro-climate, and traffic conditions.
Subject: 1172 Environmental sciences
Air pollution
Urban ecocystems
URBAN TREES
Urban vegetation
NO2
Nitrogen dioxide
Ozone
O3
Urban parks
TEMPERATURE
CANOPY COVER
BALTIMORE
Air pollution
Air Pollutants
ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
Urban vegetation
URBAN TREES
TREES
NO2
Nitrogen dioxide
OZONE
O3
Urban ecosystems
BALTIMORE
Urban parks
URBAN FORESTS
TEMPERATURE
Traffic
CANOPY COVER
micro-climate
Air purification
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