Owner-Reported Clinical Signs and Management-Related Factors in Horses Radiographed for Intestinal Sand Accumulation

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Niinistö , K E , Määttä , M A , Ruohoniemi , M O , Paulaniemi , M & Raekallio , M R 2019 , ' Owner-Reported Clinical Signs and Management-Related Factors in Horses Radiographed for Intestinal Sand Accumulation ' , Journal of Equine Veterinary Science , vol. 80 , pp. 10-15 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2019.05.012

Title: Owner-Reported Clinical Signs and Management-Related Factors in Horses Radiographed for Intestinal Sand Accumulation
Author: Niinistö, Kati E.; Määttä, Meri A.; Ruohoniemi, Mirja O.; Paulaniemi, Maria; Raekallio, Marja R.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Equine and Small Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Equine and Small Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Equine and Small Animal Medicine
University of Helsinki, Equine and Small Animal Medicine
Date: 2019-09
Language: eng
Number of pages: 6
Belongs to series: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
ISSN: 0737-0806
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/304532
Abstract: Clinical problems related to intestinal sand accumulation in horses are common in certain geographic areas, but the clinical signs appear nonspecific and the course of the accumulation remains somewhat obscure. This study examined the association between the presence and size of intestinal sand accumulations and owner-reported clinical signs, management, and feeding practices, as well as behavioral patterns in horses with radiographic diagnosis of sand accumulation. Owners of the horses filled in an online questionnaire. A total of 447 responses met the inclusion criteria. The size of the sand accumulation detected in the radiographs was not significantly associated with the age, body condition score, sex, or use of the horses. Horses reported to have expressed colic had significantly larger sand accumulations than those without this sign, and a similar association was detected in horses with poor performance. The highest odds ratio for sand accumulation was for the combination of colic and poor performance, followed by colic combined with diarrhea/loose feces or hyperesthesia to touch of the abdominal wall. Larger sand accumulations were detected in greedy horses that eat all their roughage, whereas dominant position in group hierarchy was associated with less sand. The possibility of abdominal sand accumulation should be considered as one of the differentials in horses with multiple owner-reported clinical signs such as colic, poor performance, diarrhea, and hyperesthesia to touch of the abdomen. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Subject: Clinical signs
Diarrhea
Poor performance
Group hierarchy
Greedy feeder
LARGE COLON
POOR PERFORMANCE
MAGNESIUM-SULFATE
PSYLLIUM
413 Veterinary science
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