Large-scale brain modes reorganize between infant sleep states and carry prognostic information for preterms

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Tokariev , A , Roberts , J A , Zalesky , A , Zhao , X , Vanhatalo , S , Breakspear , M & Cocchi , L 2019 , ' Large-scale brain modes reorganize between infant sleep states and carry prognostic information for preterms ' , Nature Communications , vol. 10 , 2619 . https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10467-8

Title: Large-scale brain modes reorganize between infant sleep states and carry prognostic information for preterms
Author: Tokariev, Anton; Roberts, James A.; Zalesky, Andrew; Zhao, Xuelong; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Breakspear, Michael; Cocchi, Luca
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Kliinisen neurofysiologian yksikkö
Date: 2019-06-13
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Nature Communications
ISSN: 2041-1723
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/304574
Abstract: Sleep architecture carries vital information about brain health across the lifespan. In particular, the ability to express distinct vigilance states is a key physiological marker of neurological wellbeing in the newborn infant although systems-level mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the transition from quiet to active sleep in newborn infants is marked by a substantial reorganization of large-scale cortical activity and functional brain networks. This reorganization is attenuated in preterm infants and predicts visual performance at two years. We find a striking match between these empirical effects and a computational model of large-scale brain states which uncovers fundamental biophysical mechanisms not evident from inspection of the data. Active sleep is defined by reduced energy in a uniform mode of neural activity and increased energy in two more complex anteroposterior modes. Preterm-born infants show a deficit in this sleep-related reorganization of modal energy that carries novel prognostic information.
Subject: FIELD-THEORY
RHYTHMS
EEG
CONNECTIVITY
EXPANSION
MEG
3112 Neurosciences
3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
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