The focus of temperature monitoring with zero-heat-flux technology (3M Bair-Hugger) : a clinical study with patients undergoing craniotomy

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Pesonen , E , Silvasti-Lundell , M , Niemi , T T , Kivisaari , R , Hernesniemi , J & Mäkinen , M-T 2019 , ' The focus of temperature monitoring with zero-heat-flux technology (3M Bair-Hugger) : a clinical study with patients undergoing craniotomy ' , Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing , vol. 33 , no. 5 , pp. 917-923 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10877-018-0227-z

Title: The focus of temperature monitoring with zero-heat-flux technology (3M Bair-Hugger) : a clinical study with patients undergoing craniotomy
Author: Pesonen, Eero; Silvasti-Lundell, Marja; Niemi, Tomi T.; Kivisaari, Riku; Hernesniemi, Juha; Mäkinen, Marja-Tellervo
Contributor: University of Helsinki, HUS Perioperative, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine
University of Helsinki, HUS Perioperative, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine
University of Helsinki, HUS Perioperative, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine
University of Helsinki, HUS Neurocenter
University of Helsinki, HUS Neurocenter
University of Helsinki, HUS Perioperative, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine
Date: 2019
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
ISSN: 1573-2614
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/305205
Abstract: In the noninvasive zero-heat-flux (ZHF) method, deep body temperature is brought to the skin surface when an insulated temperature probe with servo-controlled heating on the skin creates a region of ZHF from the core to the skin. The sensor of the commercial Bair-Hugger ZHF device is placed on the forehead. According to the manufacturer, the sensor reaches a depth of 1–2 cm below the skin. In this observational study, the anatomical focus of the Bair-Hugger ZHF sensor was assessed in pre- and postoperative CT or MRI images of 29 patients undergoing elective craniotomy. Assuming the 2-cm depth from the forehead skin surface, the temperature measurement point preoperatively reached the brain cortex in all except one patient. Assuming the 1-cm depth, the preoperative temperature measurement point did not reach the brain parenchyma in any of the patients and was at the cortical surface in two patients. Corresponding results were obtained postoperatively, although either sub-arachnoid fluid or air was observed in all CT/MRI images. Craniotomy did not have a detectable effect on the course of the ZHF temperatures. In Bland–Altman analysis, the agreement of ZHF temperature with the nasopharyngeal temperature was 0.11 (95% confidence interval − 0.54 to 0.75) °C and with the bladder temperature − 0.14 (− 0.81 to 0.52) °C. As conclusions, within the reported range of the Bair-Hugger ZHF measurement depth, the anatomical focus of the sensor cannot be determined. Craniotomy did not have a detectable effect on the course of the ZHF temperatures that showed good agreement with the nasopharyngeal and bladder temperatures.
Subject: 3126 Surgery, anesthesiology, intensive care, radiology
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