Phytoliths, parasites, fibers, and feathers from dental calculus and sediment from Iron Age Luistari cemetery, Finland

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/305570

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Juhola , T , Henry , A G , Kirkinen , T , Laakkonen , J & Väliranta , M 2019 , ' Phytoliths, parasites, fibers, and feathers from dental calculus and sediment from Iron Age Luistari cemetery, Finland ' , Quaternary Science Reviews , vol. 222 , 105888 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2019.105888

Title: Phytoliths, parasites, fibers, and feathers from dental calculus and sediment from Iron Age Luistari cemetery, Finland
Author: Juhola, Tytti; Henry, Amanda G.; Kirkinen, Tuija; Laakkonen, Juha; Väliranta, Minna
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Cultures
University of Helsinki, Department of Cultures
University of Helsinki, Veterinary Biosciences
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Date: 2019-10-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Quaternary Science Reviews
ISSN: 0277-3791
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/305570
Abstract: Our understanding of subsistence strategies, resources and lifeways of Finnish Iron Age populations remains incomplete despite archaeological, osteological, macrobotanical, and palynological investigations. This is due in part to poor preservation of organic macroremains in the acidic boreal sediments. To address this problem, here we present the first data from microscopic remains preserved in prehistoric dental calculus from Finland. We extracted and analysed both plant and animal microremains from human calculus and burial site sediment samples, originating from Luistari cemetery in southwestern Finland (samples from c. 600-1200 calAD). We recovered phytoliths, parasites, fibers and feathers. While in Finland few previous archaeological studies have investigated phytoliths, our study confirms the importance of these microremains for interpretating dietary patterns. It is also the first time that intestinal parasites have been reported in Finland. Our study demonstrates that, especially when working with acidic sediments typical for boreal environments, microremain studies can considerably increase the information value of archaeological samples, and that dental calculus and phytolith analysis are important new methods in the research of prehistorical lifestyles. This combined microremain analysis should be more broadly applied in contexts where other dietary records do not remain. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Subject: AESTIVUM
ARCHAEOBOTANICAL REMAINS
ASCARIS
Animal fibers
Anthropocene
Bast fibers
DICOCCON
DIET
Dental calculus
Feathers
INFLORESCENCE PHYTOLITHS
Iron age
MICROFOSSILS
MORPHOMETRIC-ANALYSIS
Micropaleontology-others
PLANT USE
Parasites
Phytoliths
Scandinavia
WHEAT TRITICUM-MONOCOCCUM
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
615 History and Archaeology
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