Childhood adversities, parental education and disability retirement among Finnish municipal employees

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Salonsalmi , A , Pietiläinen , O , Lahelma , E & Rahkonen , O 2019 , ' Childhood adversities, parental education and disability retirement among Finnish municipal employees ' , PLoS One , vol. 14 , no. 7 , 0219421 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219421

Title: Childhood adversities, parental education and disability retirement among Finnish municipal employees
Author: Salonsalmi, Aino; Pietiläinen, Olli; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Clinicum
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health
University of Helsinki, Center for Population, Health and Society
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health





Date: 2019-07-19
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219421
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/305988
Abstract: Background There is increasing evidence that childhood socioeconomic position and childhood adversities influence adult health. However, the potential contribution of these factors to disability retirement is poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the associations between childhood adversities, parental education and disability retirement. Methods Data on parental education and childhood adversities were derived from the Helsinki Health Study baseline survey, conducted in 2000–02 among 40- to 60-year old employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Data on disability retirement and their diagnoses were obtained from the Finnish Centre of Pensions and followed until the end of 2016. The analyses included 5992 employees. The associations of parental education and childhood adversities with disability retirement due to any cause, musculoskeletal diseases and mental disorders were analysed using Cox regression analysis. Results Low parental education was associated with an increased risk of disability retirement due to any cause (maternal education: HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.16–2.62; paternal education: 1.86, 1.38–2.51) and due to musculoskeletal diseases (maternal education: 4.44, 1.66–11.92; paternal education: 3.81, 2.02–7.17). However, adjustment for own education mainly abolished the associations. Economic difficulties in the childhood family, parental alcohol problems and having been bullied at school or by peers increased the risk of disability retirement due to all studied diagnostic groups, whereas parental death or divorce had no effect. Childhood illness (1.53, 1.20–1.95) and parental mental illness (1.68, 1.28–2.20) were associated with disability retirement due to any cause and due to mental disorders (1.65, 1.05–2.59; 3.60, 2.46–5.26). The associations between childhood adversities and disability retirement remained after adjustment for own education, whereas working conditions, and weight and health behaviours somewhat attenuated the associations. Conclusions Parental education and childhood adversities contributed to disability retirement even in midlife. Policy actions investing in children’s well-being might promote work ability in midlife.
Subject: 3142 Public health care science, environmental and occupational health
LABOR-FORCE PARTICIPATION
SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
MENTAL-HEALTH
SOCIAL-CLASS
LIFE-COURSE
CHRONIC DISEASE
YOUNG MEN
FOLLOW-UP
PENSION
RISK
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