Impact of non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation on cognitive brain functions in healthy subjects : an ERP study

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http://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:hulib-201910303807
Title: Impact of non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation on cognitive brain functions in healthy subjects : an ERP study
Author: Failla, Laura
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Publisher: Helsingin yliopisto
Date: 2019
Language: eng
URI: http://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:hulib-201910303807
http://hdl.handle.net/10138/306559
Thesis level: master's thesis
Degree program: Neurotieteiden maisteriohjelma
Master's Programme in Neuroscience
Magisterprogrammet i neurovetenskap
Specialisation: Neurotiede
Neuroscience
Neurovetenskap
Abstract: The vagus nerve is the longest nerve of the autonomic nervous system. It innervates, among other organs, the stomach, the lungs and the heart, and it reaches several areas of the brain, including the locus coeruleus and the amygdala. The invasive stimulation of this nerve (vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS) is a currently used method for the treatment of refractory epilepsy and pharmaco-resistant depression (Englot et al. 2011; O’Reardon et al., 2006), but the impact that this technique might have on the brain physiology and functions is still under investigation. Various studies (Frangos et al., 2015; Yakunina et al., 2016; Hansen, 2019) have shown that VNS increases noradrenaline production in the brain, a neurotransmitter that is involved in several cognitive processes, such as sleep and mood control. Furthermore, in a study on patients with epilepsy, by Sun et al. in 2017, VNS appeared to have a clear effect on working memory and emotion-attention interaction. Nevertheless, VNS presents all the risks and potential complications that characterize invasive procedures requiring surgery. Therefore, research is now focusing on safer, non-invasive alternatives, such as transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS). This technique allows to stimulate the nerve through its sensory fibres, located in the cymba and tragus of the ear. The scope of the present study was to see whether tVNS would have the same effects on cognitive and affective functions as VNS. The sample for this single blind placebo-controlled study was composed of 30 healthy subjects between 18 and 45 years old. Exclusion criteria included a history of psychiatric, neurological or cardiovascular diseases. All subjects were asked to complete a computer-based task, the Executive Reaction Times-Test. Throughout the test the subjects alternately received an active or a placebo stimulation, and their brain activity was recorded for the whole duration of the test using a 64-channel EEG cap. The Executive-Reaction Times-Test was chosen for this study because it allows to test multiple executive functions simultaneously. The subjects were presented with a series of stimuli on a screen and were asked to react as fast and accurately as possible to “Go” signals, and to refrain from responding when “NoGo” signals appeared. The test started with a triangle pointing either up- or downwards, followed by a brief pause and a traffic light image. The traffic light showed either a red or a green light and included an emotional distractor in the form of a spider or a flower. The red and green lights were alternately used as “Go” or “NoGo” signals, and the rule changed at each test block. In order to complete the task, subjects needed to keep the image of the triangle in their working memory, stay focused on the stimuli and be ready to react or be able to inhibit any responses, thus several main executive functions are being tested: inhibitory control, working memory, attention and emotion-attention interaction. Active stimulation was delivered through clip electrodes that were attached to the tragus of the left ear, whereas placebo stimulation was delivered through clip electrodes that were attached to the left ear lobe. The subjects were not aware of the difference between the two locations. Only the data of 18 subjects was used for the results analysis, because of technical difficulties with the EEG data (some recordings were too noisy, some presented flat channels). The behavioural data was divided into reaction times and errors, which were separately analysed. The EEG data was used to extract the amplitudes of the ERP peaks N2 and P3. The former is a negative peak visible at 200-350ms; the latter is a positive peak visible at 300-500ms. Previous studies have shown the peaks to be associated with response conflict and inhibition (Falkenstein et al., 1999; Donkers et al., 2004; Smith et al., 2013). The behavioural data analysis did not show any significant effect of stimulation on reaction times or error amounts. The ERP analysis, instead, returned interesting results. We observed a main effect of stimulation (p=0.04) in “NoGo” conditions. There was a significant reduction in the N2P3 amplitude and the N2 amplitude in “NoGo” conditions, with active stimulation compared to placebo. These results seem to suggest that with tVNS, fewer cognitive resources are allocated to resolve the inhibitory task, without worsening the subjects’ performance. The lack of significance in the behavioural results might have been due to a ceiling effect, with the Executive Reaction Times-test being too easy for our sample. Overall, the number of errors was too low to conduct a reliable statistical analysis. Nevertheless, the effects we observed on brain physiology would suggest that further research is needed to explore the actual impact of tVNS on cognitive and affective functions.
Subject: neuromodulation
vagus nerve
transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation(tVNS)
reaction times
event related potential (ERP)
N2P3 complex
Executive Reaction Times-test


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