The physiology of Agaricus bisporus in semi-commercial compost cultivation appears to be highly conserved among unrelated isolates

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/307187

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Pontes , M V A , Patyshakuliyeva , A , Post , H , Jurak , E , Hilden , K , Altelaar , M , Heck , A , Kabel , M A , de Vries , R P & Mäkelä , M R 2018 , ' The physiology of Agaricus bisporus in semi-commercial compost cultivation appears to be highly conserved among unrelated isolates ' , Fungal Genetics and Biology , vol. 112 , pp. 12-20 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fgb.2017.12.004

Title: The physiology of Agaricus bisporus in semi-commercial compost cultivation appears to be highly conserved among unrelated isolates
Author: Pontes, Maria Victoria Aguilar; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Post, Harm; Jurak, Edita; Hilden, Kristiina; Altelaar, Maarten; Heck, Albert; Kabel, Mirjam A.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Mäkelä, Miia R.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
Date: 2018-03
Language: eng
Number of pages: 9
Belongs to series: Fungal Genetics and Biology
ISSN: 1087-1845
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/307187
Abstract: The white button mushroom Agaricus bisporus is one of the most widely produced edible fungus with a great economical value. Its commercial cultivation process is often performed on wheat straw and animal manure based compost that mainly contains lignocellulosic material as a source of carbon and nutrients for the mushroom production. As a large portion of compost carbohydrates are left unused in the current mushroom cultivation process, the aim of this work was to study wild-type A. bisporus strains for their potential to convert the components that are poorly utilized by the commercial strain A15. We therefore focused our analysis on the stages where the fungus is producing fruiting bodies. Growth profiling was used to identify A. bisporus strains with different abilities to use plant biomass derived polysaccharides, as well as to transport and metabolize the corresponding monomeric sugars. Six wild-type isolates with diverse growth profiles were compared for mushroom production to A15 strain in semi-commercial cultivation conditions. Transcriptome and proteome analyses of the three most interesting wild-type strains and A15 indicated that the unrelated A. bisporus strains degrade and convert plant biomass polymers in a highly similar manner. This was also supported by the chemical content of the compost during the mushroom production process. Our study therefore reveals a highly conserved physiology for unrelated strains of this species during growth in compost.
Subject: Agaricus bisporus
Transcriptomics
Proteomics
Carbohydrate active enzymes
Carbon metabolism
Commercial cultivation
MUSHROOM AGARICUS-BISPORUS
ENZYME-ACTIVITIES
PLANT BIOMASS
LACCASE
GROWTH
EXPRESSION
SUBSTRATE
DATABASE
MYCELIUM
XYLAN
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
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