Pleasantness, familiarity, and identification of spice odors are interrelated and enhanced by consumption of herbs and food neophilia

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Knaapila , A , Laaksonen , O , Virtanen , M , Yang , B , Lagstrom , H & Sandell , M 2017 , ' Pleasantness, familiarity, and identification of spice odors are interrelated and enhanced by consumption of herbs and food neophilia ' , Appetite , vol. 109 , pp. 190-200 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.11.025

Title: Pleasantness, familiarity, and identification of spice odors are interrelated and enhanced by consumption of herbs and food neophilia
Author: Knaapila, Antti; Laaksonen, Oskar; Virtanen, Markus; Yang, Baoru; Lagstrom, Hanna; Sandell, Mari
Contributor organization: Department of Food and Nutrition
Food Sciences
Senses and Food
Date: 2017-02-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Appetite
ISSN: 0195-6663
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.11.025
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/307968
Abstract: The primary dimension of odor is pleasantness, which is associated with a multitude of factors. We investigated how the pleasantness, familiarity, and identification of spice odors were associated with each other and with the use of the respective spice, overall use of herbs, and level of food neophobia. A total of 126 adults (93 women, 33 men; age 25-61 years, mean 39 years) rated the odors from 12 spices (oregano, anise, rosemary, mint, caraway, sage, thyme, cinnamon, fennel, marjoram, garlic, and clove) for pleasantness and familiarity, and completed a multiple-choice odor identification. Data on the use of specific spices, overall use of herbs, and Food Neophobia Scale score were collected using an online questionnaire. Familiar odors were mostly rated as pleasant (except garlic), whereas unfamiliar odors were rated as neutral (r = 0.63). We observed consistent and often significant trends that suggested the odor pleasantness and familiarity were positively associated with the correct odor identification, consumption of the respective spice, overall use of herbs, and food neophilia. Our results suggest that knowledge acquisition through repetitive exposure to spice odor with active attention may gradually increase the odor pleasantness within the framework set by the chemical characteristics of the aroma compound. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Subject: Aroma
Human
Food neophobia scale
Olfaction
Orthonasal
Smell
OLFACTORY KNOWLEDGE
AFFECTIVE RESPONSES
NEOPHOBIA
PERCEPTION
INTENSITY
COMPLEXITY
ODORANTS
EXPOSURE
TRAIT
TWIN
416 Food Science
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc_nd
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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