Effects of Initial Age Structure of Managed Norway Spruce Forest Area on Net Climate Impact of Using Forest Biomass for Energy

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Kilpeläinen , A , Strandman , H , Grönholm , T , Ikonen , V -P , Torssonen , P , Kellomaki , S & Peltola , H 2017 , ' Effects of Initial Age Structure of Managed Norway Spruce Forest Area on Net Climate Impact of Using Forest Biomass for Energy ' , BioEnergy Research , vol. 10 , no. 2 , pp. 499-508 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s12155-017-9821-z

Title: Effects of Initial Age Structure of Managed Norway Spruce Forest Area on Net Climate Impact of Using Forest Biomass for Energy
Author: Kilpeläinen, A.; Strandman, H.; Grönholm, T.; Ikonen, V. -P.; Torssonen, P.; Kellomaki, S.; Peltola, H.
Contributor organization: Department of Physics
INAR Physics
Date: 2017-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: BioEnergy Research
ISSN: 1939-1234
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12155-017-9821-z
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308101
Abstract: We investigated how the initial age structure of a managed, middle boreal (62A degrees N), Norway spruce-dominated (Picea abies L. Karst.) forest area affects the net climate impact of using forest biomass for energy. The model-based analysis used a gap-type forest ecosystem model linked to a life cycle assessment (LCA) tool. The net climate impact of energy biomass refers to the difference in annual net CO2 exchange between the biosystem using forest biomass (logging residues from final felling) and the fossil (reference) system using coal. In the simulations over the 80-year period, the alternative initial age structures of the forest areas were (i) skewed to the right (dominated by young stands), (ii) normally distributed (dominated by middle-aged stands), (iii) skewed to the left (dominated by mature stands), and (iv) evenly distributed (same share of different age classes). The effects of management on net climate impacts were studied using current recommendations as a baseline with a fixed rotation period of 80 years. In alternative management scenarios, the volume of the growing stock was maintained 20% higher over the rotation compared to the baseline, and/or nitrogen fertilization was used to enhance carbon sequestration. According to the results, the initial age structure of the forest area affected largely the net climate impact of using energy biomass over time. An initially right-skewed age structure produced the highest climate benefits over the 80-year simulation period, in contrast to the left-skewed age structure. Furthermore, management that enhanced carbon sequestration increased the potential of energy biomass to replace coal, reducing CO2 emissions and enhancing climate change mitigation.
Subject: Bioenergy
Climate impact
Forest biomass
Forest management
Radiative forcing
Substitution
LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT
CARBON-DIOXIDE EMISSIONS
BOREAL FORESTS
CHANGE MITIGATION
CHANGING CLIMATE
FOSSIL-FUEL
BIOENERGY
RESIDUES
FERTILIZATION
ECOSYSTEM
114 Physical sciences
4112 Forestry
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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