Long-Term Drainage Reduces CO2 Uptake and CH4 Emissions in a Siberian Permafrost Ecosystem

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Kittler , F , Heimann , M , Kolle , O , Zimov , N , Zimov , S & Gockede , M 2017 , ' Long-Term Drainage Reduces CO2 Uptake and CH4 Emissions in a Siberian Permafrost Ecosystem ' , Global Biogeochemical Cycles , vol. 31 , no. 12 , pp. 1704-1717 . https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GB005774

Title: Long-Term Drainage Reduces CO2 Uptake and CH4 Emissions in a Siberian Permafrost Ecosystem
Author: Kittler, Fanny; Heimann, Martin; Kolle, Olaf; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergei; Gockede, Mathias
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Physics
Date: 2017-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: Global Biogeochemical Cycles
ISSN: 0886-6236
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308103
Abstract: Permafrost landscapes in northern high latitudes with their massive organic carbon stocks are an important, poorly known, component of the global carbon cycle. However, in light of future Arctic warming, the sustainability of these carbon pools is uncertain. To a large part, this is due to a limited understanding of the carbon cycle processes because of sparse observations in Arctic permafrost ecosystems. Here we present an eddy covariance data set covering more than 3 years of continuous CO2 and CH4 flux observations within a moist tussock tundra ecosystem near Chersky in north-eastern Siberia. Through parallel observations of a disturbed (drained) area and a control area nearby, we aim to evaluate the long-term effects of a persistently lowered water table on the net vertical carbon exchange budgets and the dominating biogeochemical mechanisms. Persistently drier soils trigger systematic shifts in the tundra ecosystem carbon cycle patterns. Both, uptake rates of CO2 and emissions of CH4 decreased. Year-round measurements emphasize the importance of the non-growing seasonin particular the zero-curtain period in the fallto the annual budget. Approximately 60% of the CO2 uptake in the growing season is lost during the cold seasons, while CH4 emissions during the non-growing season account for 30% of the annual budget. Year-to-year variability in temperature conditions during the late growing season was identified as the primary control of the interannual variability observed in the CO2 and CH4 fluxes.
Subject: eddy-covariance
carbon fluxes
permafrost
climate change
Arctic
CARBON-DIOXIDE
ARCTIC TUNDRA
COLD SEASON
TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENCE
ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE
METHANE EMISSIONS
FLUX MEASUREMENTS
POLYGONAL TUNDRA
TUSSOCK TUNDRA
GROWING-SEASON
114 Physical sciences
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