Fluoxetine-induced plasticity in the visual cortex outlasts the duration of the naturally occurring critical period

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Steinzeig , A , Cannarozzo , C & Castren , E 2019 , ' Fluoxetine-induced plasticity in the visual cortex outlasts the duration of the naturally occurring critical period ' , European Journal of Neuroscience , vol. 50 , no. 10 , pp. 3663-3673 . https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14512

Title: Fluoxetine-induced plasticity in the visual cortex outlasts the duration of the naturally occurring critical period
Author: Steinzeig, Anna; Cannarozzo, Cecilia; Castren, Eero
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
University of Helsinki, Neuroscience Center
Date: 2019-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: European Journal of Neuroscience
ISSN: 0953-816X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308439
Abstract: Heightened neuronal plasticity expressed during early postnatal life has been thought to permanently decline once critical periods have ended. For example, monocular deprivation is able to shift ocular dominance in the mouse visual cortex during the first months of life, but this effect is lost later in life. However, various treatments, such as the antidepressant fluoxetine, can reactivate a critical period-like plasticity in the adult brain. When monocular deprivation is supplemented with chronic fluoxetine administration, a major shift in ocular dominance is produced after the critical period has ended. In the current study, we characterized the temporal patterns of fluoxetine-induced plasticity in the adult mouse visual cortex, using in vivo optical imaging. We found that artificially induced plasticity in ocular dominance extended beyond the duration of the naturally occurring critical period and continued as long as fluoxetine was administered. However, this fluoxetine-induced plasticity period ended as soon as the drug was not given. These features of antidepressant-induced plasticity may be useful when designing treatment strategies involving long-term antidepressant treatment in humans.
Subject: experience-dependent plasticity
mouse brain
neuronal plasticity
optical imaging
visual cortex
OCULAR DOMINANCE PLASTICITY
ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS
NETWORK PLASTICITY
PERINEURONAL NETS
BRAIN PLASTICITY
BDNF
NEUROGENESIS
PARVALBUMIN
INHIBITION
MATURATION
3112 Neurosciences
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