Cotton-Grass and Blueberry have Opposite Effect on Peat Characteristics and Nutrient Transformation in Peatland

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308752

Citation

Kastovska , E , Strakova , P , Edwards , K , Urbanova , Z , Barta , J , Mastny , J , Santruckova , H & Picek , T 2018 , ' Cotton-Grass and Blueberry have Opposite Effect on Peat Characteristics and Nutrient Transformation in Peatland ' , Ecosystems , vol. 21 , no. 3 , pp. 443-458 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-017-0159-3

Title: Cotton-Grass and Blueberry have Opposite Effect on Peat Characteristics and Nutrient Transformation in Peatland
Author: Kastovska, Eva; Strakova, Petra; Edwards, Keith; Urbanova, Zuzana; Barta, Jiri; Mastny, Jiri; Santruckova, Hana; Picek, Tomas
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Sciences
Date: 2018-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 16
Belongs to series: Ecosystems
ISSN: 1432-9840
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308752
Abstract: Peatlands are large repositories of carbon (C). Sphagnum mosses play a key role in C sequestration, whereas the presence of vascular plants is generally thought to stimulate peat decomposition. Recent studies stress the importance of plant species for peat quality and soil microbial activity. Thus, learning about specific plant-microbe-soil relations and their potential feedbacks for C and nutrient cycling are important for a correct understanding of C sequestration in peatlands and its potential shift associated with vegetation change. We studied how the long-term presence of blueberry and cotton-grass, the main vascular dominants of spruce swamp forests, is reflected in the peat characteristics, soil microbial biomass and activities, and the possible implications of their spread for nutrient cycling and C storage in these systems. We showed that the potential effect of vascular plants on ecosystem functioning is species specific and need not necessarily result in increased organic matter decomposition. Although the presence of blueberry enhanced phosphorus availability, soil microbial biomass and the activities of C-acquiring enzymes, cotton-grass strongly depleted phosphorus and nitrogen from the peat. The harsh conditions and prevailing anoxia retarded the decomposition of cotton-grass litter and caused no significant enhancement in microbial biomass and exoenzymatic activity. Therefore, the spread of blueberry in peatlands may stimulate organic matter decomposition and negatively affect the C sequestration process, whereas the potential spread of cotton-grass would not likely change the functioning of peatlands as C sinks.
Subject: peatlands
C/N/P stoichiometry
vascular plants
Sphagnum
nutrient
availability
decomposition
enzymatic activity
CUT-AWAY PEATLAND
ERIOPHORUM-VAGINATUM
MICROBIAL BIOMASS
CO2 EXCHANGE
LITTER DECOMPOSITION
ORGANIC-MATTER
ECOENZYMATIC STOICHIOMETRY
EXTRACTION METHOD
BOREAL PEATLANDS
CLIMATE-CHANGE
1172 Environmental sciences
4112 Forestry
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Ka_tovsk_et_al._2018_Ecosystems.pdf 1.478Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record