Early root growth and architecture of fast- and slow-growing Norway spruce (Picea abies) families differ-potential for functional adaptation

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308811

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Hamberg , L , Velmala , S M , Sievänen , R , Kalliokoski , T & Pennanen , T 2018 , ' Early root growth and architecture of fast- and slow-growing Norway spruce (Picea abies) families differ-potential for functional adaptation ' , Tree Physiology , vol. 38 , no. 6 , pp. 853-864 . https://doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpx159

Title: Early root growth and architecture of fast- and slow-growing Norway spruce (Picea abies) families differ-potential for functional adaptation
Author: Hamberg, Leena; Velmala, Sannakajsa M.; Sievänen, Risto; Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Pennanen, Taina
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Date: 2018-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Tree Physiology
ISSN: 0829-318X
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/308811
Abstract: The relationship between the growth rate of aboveground parts of trees and fine root development is largely unknown. We investigated the early root development of fast-and slow-growing Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) families at a developmental stage when the difference in size is not yet observed. Seedling root architecture data, describing root branching, were collected with the WinRHIZO (TM) image analysis system, and mixed models were used to determine possible differences between the two growth phenotypes. A new approach was used to investigate the spatial extent of root properties along the whole sample root from the base of 1-year-old seedlings to the most distal part of a root. The root architecture of seedlings representing fastgrowing phenotypes showed similar to 30% higher numbers of root branches and tips, which resulted in larger root extensions and potentially a better ability to acquire nutrients. Seedlings of fast-growing phenotypes oriented and allocated root tips and bio-mass further away from the base of the seedling than those growing slowly, a possible advantage in nutrient-limited and heterogeneous boreal forest soils. We conclude that a higher long-term growth rate of the aboveground parts in Norway spruce may relate to greater allocation of resources to explorative roots that confers a competitive edge during early growth phases in forest ecosystems.
Subject: fine roots
mixed models
phenotypes
seedlings
WinRHIZO (TM)
FINE ROOTS
SCOTS PINE
LATITUDINAL GRADIENT
FORAGING STRATEGIES
TEMPERATE FOREST
BOREAL FORESTS
TRAITS
TREES
MORPHOLOGY
NITROGEN
4112 Forestry
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