Do maternal knowledge and paternal knowledge of children's whereabouts buffer differently against alcohol use? : A longitudinal study among Finnish boys and girls

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Lindfors , P , Minkkinen , J , Katainen , A H & Rimpelä , A 2019 , ' Do maternal knowledge and paternal knowledge of children's whereabouts buffer differently against alcohol use? A longitudinal study among Finnish boys and girls ' , Drug and Alcohol Dependence , vol. 194 , pp. 351-357 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.10.025

Title: Do maternal knowledge and paternal knowledge of children's whereabouts buffer differently against alcohol use? : A longitudinal study among Finnish boys and girls
Author: Lindfors, Pirjo; Minkkinen, Jaana; Katainen, Anu Hannele; Rimpelä, Arja
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Social Policy


Date: 2019-01-01
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
ISSN: 0376-8716
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.10.025
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/309248
Abstract: Background: Previous research suggests that parental knowledge of the child's activities and whereabouts prevents adolescents' alcohol use. However, evidence on whether the positive effects of maternal and paternal knowledge are distinctive for boys' and girls' alcohol use is inconclusive. We examined whether perceived parental knowledge at age 13 prevents alcohol use at age 16, whether the effect of maternal and paternal knowledge was the same for both genders, and whether paternal knowledge had as strong an effect as maternal knowledge. Method: Adolescents answered a school survey in 2011 (age 13) and 2014 (age 16) in Finland (N = 5742). Perceived maternal and paternal knowledge was measured separately using a Parents' Monitoring Scale. The data were analysed via moderation regression modelling using Bayesian estimation. Results: Perceived maternal and paternal knowledge at age 13 predicted boys' and girls' lower alcohol use at age 16. For those who had not used alcohol at age 13, parental knowledge protected against an increase of alcohol use at age 16. Both maternal and paternal knowledge had a shielding effect against the increase of boys' and girls' alcohol use, but maternal knowledge had a stronger shielding effect than paternal knowledge. Conclusions: Both maternal and paternal perceived knowledge at age 13 buffers against the adverse development of alcohol use at age 16 for both genders. Underlining the importance of parent-child communication and knowledge about the child's activities should be a part of family health counselling and school health services.
Subject: 5141 Sociology
adolescent health
association
adolescent
alcohol use
behavior
drinking
families
Finland
gender-differences
impact
longitudinal analysis
parenting practices
predictors
parental knowledge
risk
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