Defences against brood parasites from a social immunity perspective

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310001

Citation

Cotter , S C , Pincheira-Donoso , D & Thorogood , R 2019 , ' Defences against brood parasites from a social immunity perspective ' , Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Biological Sciences , vol. 374 , no. 1769 , 20180207 . https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2018.0207 , https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2018.0207

Title: Defences against brood parasites from a social immunity perspective
Author: Cotter, S. C.; Pincheira-Donoso, D.; Thorogood, R.
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Date: 2019-02
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8436
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310001
Abstract: Parasitic interactions are so ubiquitous that all multicellular organisms have evolved a system of defences to reduce their costs, whether the parasites they encounter are the “classic parasites” that feed on the individual, or “brood parasites” that usurp parental care. Many parallels have been drawn between defences deployed against both types of parasite, but typically, whilst defences against classic parasites have been selected to protect survival, those against brood parasites have been selected to protect the parent’s inclusive fitness, suggesting that the selection pressures they impose are fundamentally different. However, there is another class of defences against classic parasites that have specifically been selected to protect an individual’s inclusive fitness, known as “social immunity”. Social immune responses include the anti-parasite defences typically provided for others in kin-structured groups, such as the antifungal secretions produced by termite workers to protect the brood. Defences against brood parasites, therefore, are more closely aligned with social immune responses. Much like social immunity, host defences against brood parasitism are employed by a donor (a parent) for the benefit of one or more recipients (typically kin), and as with social defences against classic parasites, defences have therefore evolved to protect the donor’s inclusive fitness, not the survival or ultimately the fitness of individual recipients This can lead to severe conflicts between the different parties, whose interests are not always aligned. Here we consider defences against brood parasitism in the light of social immunity, at different stages of parasite encounter, addressing where conflicts occur and how they might be resolved. We finish with considering how this approach could help us to address longstanding questions in our understanding of brood parasitism.
Subject: bird
cuckoo
defences
kleptoparasite
fish
social insect
DENSITY-DEPENDENT PROPHYLAXIS
TERMITE ZOOTERMOPSIS-ANGUSTICOLLIS
AVIAN CLUTCH SIZE
DISEASE RESISTANCE
CUTICULAR HYDROCARBONS
POPULATION-DYNAMICS
GLAND SECRETION
BREEDING STATUS
PARENTAL CARE
CUCKOO
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Cotter_et_al_PT_preprint.pdf 822.1Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record