Source Apportionment of Brown Carbon Absorption by Coupling Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310516

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Moschos , V , Kumar , N K , Dällenbach , K , Baltensperger , U , Prevot , A S H & El Haddad , I 2018 , ' Source Apportionment of Brown Carbon Absorption by Coupling Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry ' , Environmental Science & Technology Letters , vol. 5 , no. 6 , pp. 302-+ . https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.estlett.8b00118

Title: Source Apportionment of Brown Carbon Absorption by Coupling Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy with Aerosol Mass Spectrometry
Author: Moschos, Vaios; Kumar, Nivedita K.; Dällenbach, Kaspar; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre S. H.; El Haddad, Imad
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR)
Date: 2018-06
Language: eng
Number of pages: 13
Belongs to series: Environmental Science & Technology Letters
ISSN: 2328-8930
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310516
Abstract: The impact of brown carbon (BrC) on climate has been widely acknowledged but remains uncertain, because either its contribution to absorption is being ignored in most climate models or the associated mixed emission sources and atmospheric lifetime are not accounted for. In this work, we propose positive matrix factorization as a framework to apportion the contributions of individual primary and secondary organic aerosol (OA) source components of BrC absorption, by combining long-term aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) data with concurrent ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy measurements. The former feature time-depend ent factor contributions to OA mass, and the latter consist of wavelength-dependent absorption coefficients. Using this approach for a full-year case study, we estimate for the first time the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of major light-absorbing water soluble OA components in the atmosphere. We show that secondary biogenic OA contributes negligibly to absorption despite dominating the mass concentration in the summer. In contrast, primary and secondary wood burning emissions are highly absorbing up to 500 nm. The approach allowed us to constrain their MAE within a confined range consistent with previous laboratory work, which can be used in climate models to estimate the impact of BrC from these emissions on the overall absorption.
Subject: SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS
SOUTHEASTERN UNITED-STATES
BIOMASS BURNING PARTICLES
COMPLEX REFRACTIVE-INDEX
LIGHT-ABSORPTION
OPTICAL-PROPERTIES
ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS
SEASONAL-VARIATIONS
MULTILINEAR ENGINE
SUBSTANCES HULIS
Environmental science
Ecology
119 Other natural sciences
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