Archaea are prominent members of the prokaryotic communities colonizing common forest mushrooms

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310518

Citation

Rinta-Kanto , J M , Pehkonen , K , Sinkko , H , Tamminen , M V & Timonen , S 2018 , ' Archaea are prominent members of the prokaryotic communities colonizing common forest mushrooms ' , Canadian Journal of Microbiology , vol. 64 , no. 10 , pp. 716-726 . https://doi.org/10.1139/cjm-2018-0035

Title: Archaea are prominent members of the prokaryotic communities colonizing common forest mushrooms
Author: Rinta-Kanto, J. M.; Pehkonen, K.; Sinkko, H.; Tamminen, M. V.; Timonen, S.
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology
University of Helsinki, University of Turku
University of Helsinki, Department of Microbiology


Date: 2018-10
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Canadian Journal of Microbiology
ISSN: 0008-4166
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1139/cjm-2018-0035
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310518
Abstract: In this study, the abundance and composition of prokaryotic communities associated with the inner tissue of fruiting bodies of Suillus bovinus, Boletus pinophilus, Cantharellus cibarius, Agaricus arvensis, Lycoperdon perlatum, and Piptoporus betulinus were analyzed using culture-independent methods. Our findings indicate that archaea and bacteria colonize the internal tissues of all investigated specimens and that archaea are prominent members of the prokaryotic community. The ratio of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers to those of bacteria was >1 in the fruiting bodies of four out of six fungal species included in the study. The largest proportion of archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to thaumarchaeotal classes Terrestrial group, Miscellaneous Crenar-chaeotic Group (MCG), and Thermoplasmata. Bacterial communities showed characteristic compositions in each fungal species. Bacterial classes Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacilli, and Clostridia were prominent among communities in fruiting body tissues. Bacterial populations in each fungal species had different characteristics. The results of this study imply that fruiting body tissues are an important habitat for abundant and diverse populations of archaea and bacteria.
Subject: bacteria
archaea
mushroom
qPCR
sequencing
BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES
PSEUDOMONAS-FLUORESCENS
CANTHARELLUS-CIBARIUS
CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION
NUTRITIONAL-VALUE
MARINE-SEDIMENTS
TUBER-MAGNATUM
SEQUENCE DATA
FRUIT BODIES
SCOTS PINE
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Rintakanto_etal_2018.pdf 686.6Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record