Amber inclusions from New Zealand

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310825

Citation

Schmidt , A , Kaulfuss , U , Bannister , J , Baronov , V , Beimforde , C , Bleile , N , Borkent , A , Busch , A , Conran , J , Engel , M , Harvey , M , Kennedy , E , Kerr , P , Kettunen , E J , Kiecksee , A , Lengeling , F , Lindqvist , J , Maraun , M , Mildenhall , D , Perrichot , V , Rikkinen , J , Sadowski , E-M , Seyfullah , L , Stebner , F , Szwedo , J , Ulbrich , P & Lee , D 2018 , ' Amber inclusions from New Zealand ' , Gondwana Research , vol. 56 , pp. 135-146 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gr.2017.12.003

Title: Amber inclusions from New Zealand
Author: Schmidt, Alexander; Kaulfuss, Uwe; Bannister, Jennifer; Baronov, Victor; Beimforde, Christina; Bleile, Natalie; Borkent, Art; Busch, Ariane; Conran, John; Engel, Michael; Harvey, Mark; Kennedy, Elisabeth; Kerr, Peter; Kettunen, Elina Johanna; Kiecksee, Anna; Lengeling, Franziska; Lindqvist, Jon; Maraun, Mark; Mildenhall, Dallas; Perrichot, Vincent; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sadowski, Eva-Maria; Seyfullah, Leyla; Stebner, Frauke; Szwedo, Jacek; Ulbrich, Philipp; Lee, Daphne
Contributor organization: Biosciences
Lichens
Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS)
Finnish Museum of Natural History
Viikki Plant Science Centre (ViPS)
Plant Biology
Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme
Teachers' Academy
Date: 2018-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Gondwana Research
ISSN: 1342-937X
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gr.2017.12.003
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310825
Abstract: Terrestrial ecosystems of the long-isolated former Gondwanan landmass of New Zealand are hotspots of modern global biodiversity, based on the level of endemism and distinctiveness of the biota. However, little is known of the evolutionary history of the rarely preserved but diverse, distinctive, fragile, mainly soft-bodied organisms such as arthropods and fungi that comprise 95% of biodiversity in forest ecosystems. Our discovery of fossils preserved in Oligocene/Miocene amber of araucarian origin reveals a diverse invertebrate and fungal biota and complex ecological networks. These fossils comprise 10 orders and approximately 20 families of terrestrial arthropods and include representatives of Pseudoscorpiones, Acari, Araneae, Collembola, Hemiptera, Psocoptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera, together with nematodes, mold fungi and araucarian wood. Ecologically the fossils encompass predators such as spiders with web remains, soil and bark mites, detritivores, parasites, fungivores and decomposers, fungi that grew on solidified resin flows, as well as predatory fungi. This study reports the first major amber deposit with an abundance of biological inclusions from the Southern Hemisphere and the only Cenozoic one of verified araucarian origin. These fossils expand the global record and evolutionary history of many arthropod and fungal groups, providing insights into mid-Cenozoic araucarian forest ecosystems and resolving controversial issues around the antecedents of the modem New Zealand terrestrial biota. (C) 2017 International Association for Gondwana Research. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1183 Plant biology, microbiology, virology
AMBER
ARACHNIDS
FUNGI
HAXAPODA
SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE
TERRESTRIAL FAUNA
MIDDLE MIOCENE
SOUTH-AMERICA
FOULDEN MAAR
SOOTY MOLDS
DIPTERA
OTAGO
OLIGOCENE
INSECTS
EOCENE
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc_nd
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Schmidt_et_al._2018.pdf 1.264Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record