Apparent survival, territory turnover and site fidelity rates in Northern Goshawk Accipiter gentilis populations close to the northern range limit

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310845

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Tolvanen , J , Pakanen , V-M , Valkama , J & Tornberg , R 2017 , ' Apparent survival, territory turnover and site fidelity rates in Northern Goshawk Accipiter gentilis populations close to the northern range limit ' , Bird Study , vol. 64 , no. 2 , pp. 168-177 . https://doi.org/10.1080/00063657.2017.1309351

Title: Apparent survival, territory turnover and site fidelity rates in Northern Goshawk Accipiter gentilis populations close to the northern range limit
Author: Tolvanen, Jere; Pakanen, Veli-Matti; Valkama, Jari; Tornberg, Risto
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Finnish Museum of Natural History
Date: 2017
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Bird Study
ISSN: 0006-3657
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310845
Abstract: Capsule: Mark-recapture data suggest low apparent survival and sex- and population-specific site fidelity and territory turnover in adult Northern Goshawks Accipiter gentilis breeding in northern Europe.Aims: To understand how species cope with global environmental change requires knowledge of variation in population demographic rates, especially from populations close to the species' northern range limit and from keystone species such as raptors. We analyse apparent survival and breeding dispersal propensity of adult Northern Goshawks breeding in northern Europe.Methods: We used long-term mark-recapture data from two populations in Finland, northern Europe, and Cormack-Jolly-Seber models and binomial generalized linear models to investigate sex- and population-specific variation in apparent survival, territory turnover and site fidelity.Results: We report low apparent survival (53-72%) of breeding adult Goshawks. Breeding dispersal propensity was higher in females than males, especially in northern Finland, contrasting with previous studies that suggest high site fidelity in both sexes.Conclusion: Low apparent survival in females may be mainly due to permanent emigration outside the study areas, whereas in males the survival rate may truly be low. Both demographic aspects may be driven by the combination of sex-specific roles related to breeding and difficult environmental conditions prevailing in northern latitudes during the non-breeding season.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1172 Environmental sciences
MARKED ANIMALS
CLIMATE-CHANGE
HABITAT SELECTION
PREY
PREDATION
DISPERSAL
WINTER
BIRDS
CONSERVATION
LANDSCAPE
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