Association of sleep duration and sleep quality with the physical, social, and emotional functioning among Australian adults

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310980

Citation

Lallukka , T , Sivertsen , B , Kronholm , E , Bin , Y S , Overland , S & Glozier , N 2018 , ' Association of sleep duration and sleep quality with the physical, social, and emotional functioning among Australian adults ' , Sleep health , vol. 4 , no. 2 , pp. 194-200 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2017.11.006

Title: Association of sleep duration and sleep quality with the physical, social, and emotional functioning among Australian adults
Author: Lallukka, Tea; Sivertsen, Borge; Kronholm, Erkki; Bin, Yu Sun; Overland, Simon; Glozier, Nick
Other contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health

Date: 2018-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Sleep health
ISSN: 2352-7218
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2017.11.006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/310980
Abstract: Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two key determinants of sleep health, quantity and quality, with physical, emotional, and social functioning, in the general population. Design: Nationally-representative Australian cross-sectional study. Setting: General population. Participants: 14,571 people aged 15 or older in Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) in 2013. Measurements: The associations of sleep quality (good/poor) in combination with mid-range (6-8 hours), short (8) sleep duration with functioning, determined from the SF-36, were evaluated using logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic, relationships, health behaviors, obesity, pain, and mental and physical illness confounders. Results: After adjusting for gender, and age, poor sleep quality in combination with short, mid-range and long sleep was associated with worse physical, emotional and social functioning. Pain and comorbid illness explained much of these associations, while attenuation from other covariates was minor. The associations of poor sleep quality with worse functioning remained after full adjustment regardless of sleep duration, while among people with good quality sleep, only those with long sleep duration reported poorer functioning. Conclusions: Poor sleep quality has robust associations with worse functioning regardless of total duration in the general population. There appears to be a substantial number of functional short sleepers with good quality sleep. (c) 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Subject: Population-based
Insomnia symptoms
Sleep quantity
Australia
SF-36
INSOMNIA SYMPTOMS
OF-LIFE
DISABILITY RETIREMENT
GENERAL-POPULATION
COMMUNITY SAMPLE
HILDA SURVEY
HEALTH
MORTALITY
METAANALYSIS
3112 Neurosciences
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
Rights:


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
tea_lallukka_sleep_health.pdf 2.316Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record