Mindsets and Failures : Neural Differences in Reactions to Mistakes among 2nd Grade Finnish Girls

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Puusepp , I , Tammi , T , Huotilainen , M , Kujala , T , Kuusisto , E , Laine , S & Tirri , K 2019 , Mindsets and Failures : Neural Differences in Reactions to Mistakes among 2nd Grade Finnish Girls . in S Palermo (ed.) , Behavioral Neuroscience . IntechOpen , London . https://doi.org/10.5772/intechopen.85421

Title: Mindsets and Failures : Neural Differences in Reactions to Mistakes among 2nd Grade Finnish Girls
Author: Puusepp, Ita; Tammi, Tuisku; Huotilainen, Minna; Kujala, Teija; Kuusisto, Elina; Laine, Sonja; Tirri, Kirsi
Editor: Palermo, Sara
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Department of Education
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, Department of Education
University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics
University of Helsinki, University of Humanistic Studies, Utrecht
University of Helsinki, Learning, Culture & Interventions (LECI)
University of Helsinki, Learning, Culture & Interventions (LECI)
Publisher: IntechOpen
Date: 2019-12-18
Language: eng
Number of pages: 12
Belongs to series: Behavioral Neuroscience
ISBN: 978-1-78984-052-0
978-1-78984-051-3
978-1-78985-185.3
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/311419
Abstract: Mindsets have been identified as an important factor in explaining learning differences among students. Growth mindset students have been shown to recover from mistakes easier than fixed mindset students, and recent neuroscientific research has shown differences in the brain’s event-related potentials to errors in fixed and growth mindset participants. The purpose of this study was to examine and evaluate these differences in the Finnish elementary school context. To achieve this, event-related potentials of five fixed and five growth mindset 8-9-year-old female students were recorded during a go/no-go task. Differences between the two groups emerged, however, they were different from the results of some previous studies in the field. These findings are discussed in the light of earlier neuroscientific research related to mindsets, including limitations and suggestions for future research in the field.
Subject: 515 Psychology
516 Educational sciences
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