Effects of Insect Herbivory on Bilberry Production and Removal of Berries by Frugivores

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/311754

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Koski , T-M , Kalpio , M , Laaksonen , T , Sirkiä , P , Kallio , H P , Yang , B , Linderborg , K M & Klemola , T 2017 , ' Effects of Insect Herbivory on Bilberry Production and Removal of Berries by Frugivores ' , Journal of Chemical Ecology , vol. 43 , no. 4 , pp. 422-432 . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-017-0838-8

Title: Effects of Insect Herbivory on Bilberry Production and Removal of Berries by Frugivores
Author: Koski, Tuuli-Marjaana; Kalpio, Marika; Laaksonen, Toni; Sirkiä, Päivi; Kallio, Heikki P.; Yang, Baoru; Linderborg, Kaisa M.; Klemola, Tero
Contributor organization: Finnish Museum of Natural History
Zoology
Date: 2017-04
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Journal of Chemical Ecology
ISSN: 0098-0331
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-017-0838-8
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/311754
Abstract: The evolutionary purpose of a fleshy fruit is to attract seed dispersers and get the seeds dispersed by frugivorous animals. For this reason, fruits should be highly rewarding to these mutualists. However, insect herbivory can alter plant reproductive success e.g. by decreasing fruit yield or affecting the attractiveness of the fruits to mutualistic seed dispersers. Under natural conditions, we tested the effects of experimental larval-defoliation on berry ripening and consumption of a non-cultivated dwarf shrub, the bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), which produces animal-dispersed berries with high sugar and anthocyanin concentration. Bilberry ramets with high fruit yield were most likely to have their berries foraged, indicating that frugivores made foraging choices based on the abundance of berries. Moreover, the probability for berries being foraged was the lowest for non-defoliated ramets that grew adjacent to larval-defoliated ramets, even though larval-defoliation did not affect the biochemical composition (total concentrations of anthocyanins, sugars and organic acids) or the probability of ripening of berries. We hypothesise that the lower probability for berries being foraged in these ramets may be a consequence of rhizome- or volatile-mediated communication between ramets, resulting in a priming effect of the herbivore defence and lower attractiveness of the non-defoliated ramets.
Subject: Tritrophic interactions
Mutualism
Herbivory
Frugivory
Foraging
VACCINIUM-MYRTILLUS L.
CLONAL PLANT NETWORK
RADICAL ABSORBING CAPACITY
INDUCED RESISTANCE
PHENOLIC-COMPOUNDS
FRUIT SELECTION
SEED DISPERSAL
SECONDARY METABOLITES
CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION
SIMULATED HERBIVORY
1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: acceptedVersion


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