Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction in Quantitative Head Impulse Test : Clinical Characteristics in 23 Patients

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Levo , H , Aalto , H & Hirvonen , T P 2017 , ' Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction in Quantitative Head Impulse Test : Clinical Characteristics in 23 Patients ' , The journal of international advanced otology , vol. 13 , no. 3 , pp. 354-357 . https://doi.org/10.5152/iao.2017.4211

Title: Bilateral Vestibular Hypofunction in Quantitative Head Impulse Test : Clinical Characteristics in 23 Patients
Author: Levo, Hilla; Aalto, Heikki; Hirvonen, Timo P.
Contributor organization: Korva-, nenä- ja kurkkutautien klinikka
Clinicum
Department of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology
HUS Head and Neck Center
Date: 2017-12
Language: eng
Number of pages: 4
Belongs to series: The journal of international advanced otology
ISSN: 1308-7649
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5152/iao.2017.4211
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/312075
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To explore clinical features of patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) verified in motorized head impulse test (MHIT). MATERIALS and METHODS: We examined clinical records of 23 adult patients (10 males and 13 females), whose gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in the MHIT was bilaterally lowered. Fifteen of 62 unilateral cochlear implant (CI) recipients routinely tested both pre-and postoperatively with the MHIT had BVH. Eight of 198 vestibular outpatients selected to the MHIT due to clinical causes had BVH. Clinical characteristics and a questionnaire regarding current sensations were analyzed. RESULTS: The mean gain +/- SD in the MHIT was 0.26 +/- 0.17 on the right and 0.26 +/- 0.14 on the left side. The mean gain in the CI recipients did not differ from that of vestibular outpatients (p>0.05). All outpatients with BVH suffered from oscillopsia, whereas only 46% of CI recipients experienced oscillopsia (p=0.048). Instability was more prominent (p=0.004) and quality of life further decreased (p=0.012) among vestibular outpatients compared with CI patients. Most common etiology for the BVH was meningitis. Other causes were either sudden or progressive loss of labyrinthine function, bilateral Meniere's disease, and ototoxicity. CONCLUSION: BVH is rare even in a specialized clinic. Vestibular outpatients were more disabled than CI recipients with the BVH.
Subject: Labyrinthine dysfunction
chronic instability
vestibulo-ocular reflex
vestibulopathy
VESTIBULOOCULAR REFLEX
DISORDERS
3125 Otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: cc_by_nc
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


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