Elevated serum alpha-1 antitrypsin is a major component of GlycA-associated risk for future morbidity and mortality

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Ritchie , S C , Kettunen , J , Brozynska , M , Nath , A P , Havulinna , A S , Männistö , S , Perola , M , Salomaa , V , Ala-Korpela , M , Abraham , G , Würtz , P & Inouye , M 2019 , ' Elevated serum alpha-1 antitrypsin is a major component of GlycA-associated risk for future morbidity and mortality ' , PLoS One , vol. 14 , no. 10 , e0223692 . https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0223692

Title: Elevated serum alpha-1 antitrypsin is a major component of GlycA-associated risk for future morbidity and mortality
Author: Ritchie, Scott C.; Kettunen, Johannes; Brozynska, Marta; Nath, Artika P.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Männistö, Satu; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Abraham, Gad; Würtz, Peter; Inouye, Michael
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
University of Helsinki, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland
Date: 2019-10-23
Language: eng
Number of pages: 23
Belongs to series: PLoS One
ISSN: 1932-6203
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/312798
Abstract: Background GlycA is a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy biomarker that predicts risk of disease from myriad causes. It is heterogeneous; arising from five circulating glycoproteins with dynamic concentrations: alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), haptoglobin (HP), transferrin (TF), and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT). The contributions of each glycoprotein to the disease and mortality risks predicted by GlycA remain unknown. Methods We trained imputation models for AAT, AGP, HP, and TF from NMR metabolite measurements in 626 adults from a population cohort with matched NMR and immunoassay data. Levels of AAT, AGP, and HP were estimated in 11,861 adults from two population cohorts with eight years of follow-up, then each biomarker was tested for association with all common endpoints. Whole blood gene expression data was used to identify cellular processes associated with elevated AAT. Results Accurate imputation models were obtained for AAT, AGP, and HP but not for TF. While AGP had the strongest correlation with GlycA, our analysis revealed variation in imputed AAT levels was the most predictive of morbidity and mortality for the widest range of diseases over the eight year follow-up period, including heart failure (meta-analysis hazard ratio = 1.60 per standard deviation increase of AAT, P-value = 1×10−10), influenza and pneumonia (HR = 1.37, P = 6×10−10), and liver diseases (HR = 1.81, P = 1×10−6). Transcriptional analyses revealed association of elevated AAT with diverse inflammatory immune pathways. Conclusions This study clarifies the molecular underpinnings of the GlycA biomarker’s associated disease risk, and indicates a previously unrecognised association between elevated AAT and severe disease onset and mortality.
Subject: 3111 Biomedicine
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