Early childhood infections and the use of antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics in Finland, Estonia and Russian Karelia.

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/312939

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the DIABIMMUNE Study Group , Mustonen , N , Siljander , H , Peet , A , Tillmann , V , Härkönen , T , Ilonen , J , Hyöty , H & Knip , M 2019 , ' Early childhood infections and the use of antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics in Finland, Estonia and Russian Karelia. ' , Acta Paediatrica , vol. 108 , no. 11 , pp. 2075-2082 . https://doi.org/10.1111/apa.14874

Title: Early childhood infections and the use of antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics in Finland, Estonia and Russian Karelia.
Author: the DIABIMMUNE Study Group; Mustonen, Neea; Siljander, Heli; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Härkönen, Taina; Ilonen, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki; Knip, Mikael
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Children's Hospital
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
University of Helsinki, HUS Children and Adolescents
Date: 2019-11
Language: eng
Number of pages: 8
Belongs to series: Acta Paediatrica
ISSN: 0803-5253
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/312939
Abstract: Aim Infections in early childhood are common reasons to seek medical attention. This study compares the prevalence of infections, and the use of antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics, in children from Finland, Estonia and Russian Karelia. Methods Children with a genetically increased risk for type 1 diabetes (N = 797) were observed from birth up to 3 years of age. Illnesses and medications were reported by parents continuously. All reported infections, antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics were compared between Finland and Estonia, and to a lesser extent with Russian Karelia, due to poor study compliance. Results Compared with Estonians, Finns reported more infections during the first and second years of life. During the follow-up, Finnish children had 10 infections while Estonians only had 8 (p <0.001). Finns also used more antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics in each year during the follow-up. Russian Karelians reported the lowest frequency of infections and the most infrequent use of antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics in the first two years of life. Conclusion Infections and the use of antibiotics and antipyretic-analgesics in early childhood were most frequent in Finland, where socio-economic conditions are the most developed and microbial encounters are sparse. This may reflect on the hygiene hypothesis, a less effective immune system that allows normally harmless microbes to attack and cause clinical infections.
Subject: 3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
Antibiotics
Antipyretic-analgesics
Childhood infections
The hygiene hypothesis
RESPIRATORY-TRACT INFECTIONS
ISLET AUTOIMMUNITY
NEIGHBORING COUNTRIES
EARLY-LIFE
1ST YEAR
RISK
CHILDREN
DISEASE
INFANCY
SUSCEPTIBILITY
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