Earthworm assemblages in urban habitats across biogeographical regions

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313129

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Tóth , Z , Szlavecz , K , Epp Schmidt , D J , Hornung , E , Setälä , H , Yesilonis , I D , Kotze , D J , Dombos , M , Pouyat , R , Mishra , S , Cilliers , S , Yarwood , S & Csuzdi , C 2020 , ' Earthworm assemblages in urban habitats across biogeographical regions ' , Applied Soil Ecology , vol. 151 , 103530 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apsoil.2020.103530

Title: Earthworm assemblages in urban habitats across biogeographical regions
Author: Tóth, Zsolt; Szlavecz, Katalin; Epp Schmidt, Dietrich J.; Hornung, Erzsébet; Setälä, Heikki; Yesilonis, Ian D.; Kotze, D. Johan; Dombos, Miklós; Pouyat, Richard; Mishra, Saket; Cilliers, Sarel; Yarwood, Stephanie; Csuzdi, Csaba
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
University of Helsinki, Ecosystems and Environment Research Programme
Date: 2020-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 11
Belongs to series: Applied Soil Ecology
ISSN: 0929-1393
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313129
Abstract: In urban landscapes, humans are the most significant factor determining belowground diversity, including earthworms. Within the framework of the Global Urban Soil Ecology and Education Network (GLUSEEN), a multi-city comparison was carried out to assess the effects of soil disturbance on earthworms. In each of five cities (Baltimore, USA; Budapest, Hungary; Helsinki and Lahti, Finland; Potchefstroom, South Africa), covering four climatic and biogeographical regions, four habitat types (ruderal, turf/lawn, remnant and reference) were sampled. The survey resulted in 19 species belonging to 9 genera and 4 families. The highest total species richness was recorded in Baltimore (16), while Budapest and the Finnish cities had relatively low (5–6) species numbers. Remnant forests and lawns supported the highest earthworm biomass. Soil properties (i.e. pH and organic matter content) explained neither earthworm community composition nor abundance. Evaluating all cities together, earthworm communities were significantly structured by habitat type. Communities in the two adjacent cities, Helsinki and Lahti were very similar, but Budapest clearly separated from the Finnish cities. Earthworm community structure in Baltimore overlapped with that of the other cities. Despite differences in climate, soils and biogeography among the cities, earthworm communities were highly similar within the urban habitat types. This indicates that human-mediated dispersal is an important factor shaping the urban fauna, both at local and regional scales.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
Annelid
Biodiversity
Biotic homogenization
Oligochaeta
Soil disturbance
Urbanization
ASIAN PHERETIMOID EARTHWORMS
INVASIVE EARTHWORMS
PATTERNS
AMYNTHAS-AGRESTIS
FOREST
BIOTIC HOMOGENIZATION
MICROBIAL BIOMASS
PLANT-COMMUNITIES
LAND-USE
DIVERSITY
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