Influence of organic matter, nutrients, and cyclodextrin on microbial and chemical herbicide and degradate dissipation in subsurface sediment slurries

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http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313323

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Kerminen , K A M , Moël , R L , Harju , A V & Kontro , M H 2018 , ' Influence of organic matter, nutrients, and cyclodextrin on microbial and chemical herbicide and degradate dissipation in subsurface sediment slurries ' , The Science of the Total Environment , vol. 618 , pp. 1449-1458 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.09.302

Title: Influence of organic matter, nutrients, and cyclodextrin on microbial and chemical herbicide and degradate dissipation in subsurface sediment slurries
Author: Kerminen, Kaisa Aino Maria; Moël, Romain Le; Harju, Anu Vilhelmiina; Kontro, Merja Hannele
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
University of Helsinki, Environmental Sciences
Date: 2018-03-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 10
Belongs to series: The Science of the Total Environment
ISSN: 0048-9697
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313323
Abstract: Pesticides leaching from soil to surface and groundwater are a global threat for drinking water safety, as no cleaning methods occur for groundwater environment. We examined whether peat, compost-peat-sand (CPS) mixture, NH4NO3, NH4NO3 with sodium citrate (Na-citrate), and the surfactant methyl-beta-cyclodextrin additions enhance atrazine, simazine, hexazinone, dichlobenil, and the degradate 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) dissipations in sediment slurries under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with sterilized controls. The vadose zone sediment cores were drilled from a depth of 11.3-14.6m in an herbicide-contaminated groundwater area. The peat and CPS enhanced chemical atrazine and simazine dissipation, and the peat enhanced chemical hexazinone dissipation, all oxygen-independently. Dichlobenil dissipated under all conditions, while BAM dissipation was fairly slow and half-lives could not be calculated. The chemical dissipation rates could be associated with the chemical structures and properties of the herbicides, and additive compositions, not with pH. Microbial atrazine degradation was only observed in the Pseudomonas sp. ADP amended slurries, although the sediment slurries were known to contain atrazine-degrading microorganisms. The bioavailability of atrazine in the water phase seemed to be limited, which could be due to complex formation with organic and inorganic colloids. Atrazine degradation by indigenous microbes could not be stimulated by the surfactant methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, or by the additives NH4NO3 and NH4NO3 with Na-citrate, although the nitrogen additives increased microbial growth. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Subject: 1181 Ecology, evolutionary biology
1172 Environmental sciences
Sediment slurries
Herbicides
Dissipation
Organic amendments
Nutrients
Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin
GROUNDWATER ENVIRONMENT
ATRAZINE DEGRADATION
PSEUDOMONAS SP
BOREAL REGION
NEW-ZEALAND
STRAIN ADP
SOIL
PESTICIDES
WATER
BIODEGRADATION
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