Individual-, home- and preschool-level correlates of preschool children's sedentary time

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Määttä , S , Konttinen , H , Figueiredo , R A D O , Haukkala , A , Sajaniemi , N , Erkkola , M & Roos , E 2020 , ' Individual-, home- and preschool-level correlates of preschool children's sedentary time ' , BMC Pediatrics , vol. 20 , no. 1 , 58 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-020-1948-y

Title: Individual-, home- and preschool-level correlates of preschool children's sedentary time
Author: Määttä, Suvi; Konttinen, Hanna; Figueiredo, Rejane Augusta de Oliveira; Haukkala, Ari; Sajaniemi, Nina; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva
Contributor: University of Helsinki, Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences
University of Helsinki, Sociology
University of Helsinki, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies
University of Helsinki, Department of Education
University of Helsinki, Maijaliisa Erkkola / Principal Investigator
University of Helsinki, Clinicum
Date: 2020-02-07
Language: eng
Number of pages: 14
Belongs to series: BMC Pediatrics
ISSN: 1471-2431
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313349
Abstract: Background Prechoolers' significant portions of sedentary time (ST) is a public-health concern due to its high prevalence and negative health consequences. However, few studies have explored correlates of preschoolers' ST covering individual-, home- and preschool- factors within one study. The aim of this study was to identify the associations between multiple individual-, home- and preschool-level factors and preschoolers' ST. In addition, it was studied how much individual-, home- and preschool-level factors explained the variance in children's ST. Methods A total of 864 children aged three to six, their parents and 66 preschools participated in the cross-sectional DAGIS study, which occurred between 2015 and 2016. The children wore an accelerometer for 1 week. Guardians, principals and early educators completed questionnaires covering the potential correlates of children's ST, for example, temperament, practices, self-efficacy and regulations. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted in multiple steps; calculation of marginal and conditional R-2 values occurred in the final phase. Results Of the 29 studied correlates, the following factors remained significant in the final models. Being a boy (p <0.001) and having high levels of surgency temperament (p <0.001) were associated with lower ST. Regarding the home setting, frequent co-visits in physical activity (PA) places (p = 0.014) were associated with lower ST. Higher parental perceived barriers related to children's outside PA (p = 0.032) was associated with higher ST. None of the preschool setting factors remained significant in the final model. Approximately 11% of the variance in children's ST was attributed to factors related to the individual level whereas 5% was attributed to home-level factors; and 2% to preschool-level factors. Conclusions This study identified a set of correlates of preschool children's ST. Interventions aimed at reducing children's ST should develop strategies targeting established correlates of preschoolers' ST covering individual-, home- and preschool-level factors. The preschool-level factors included in this study explained little the variance in children's ST. However, the included measures may not have captured the essential preschool-level factors that specifically influence children's ST. Therefore, more studies are needed regarding potential preschool-level factors.
Subject: children
preschool
home
parents
sedentary time
socioecological model
FAMILY-INVOLVED INTERVENTION
EARLY-LIFE PREDICTORS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
EARLY-CHILDHOOD
SOCIOECONOMIC POSITION
SEASONAL-VARIATION
PREVENT OBESITY
BEHAVIOR
CARE
CALIBRATION
3123 Gynaecology and paediatrics
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