Parental immigration and offspring post-traumatic stress disorder : A nationwide population-based register study

Show full item record



Permalink

http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313689

Citation

Silwal , S , Lehti , V , Chudal , R , Suominen , A , Lien , L & Sourander , A 2019 , ' Parental immigration and offspring post-traumatic stress disorder : A nationwide population-based register study ' , Journal of Affective Disorders , vol. 249 , pp. 294-300 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.002

Title: Parental immigration and offspring post-traumatic stress disorder : A nationwide population-based register study
Author: Silwal, Sanju; Lehti, Venla; Chudal, Roshan; Suominen, Auli; Lien, Lars; Sourander, Andre
Contributor organization: Clinicum
Department of Psychiatry
HUS Psychiatry
Date: 2019-04-15
Language: eng
Number of pages: 7
Belongs to series: Journal of Affective Disorders
ISSN: 0165-0327
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.002
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10138/313689
Abstract: Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between parental immigration status and a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in their offspring. Methods: This nested matched case-control study was based on a Finnish national birth cohort for 1987-2010 and cases were diagnosed with PTSD by 2012 from the Care Register for Health Care. We identified 3639 cases and 14,434 controls individually matched for gender, place and date of birth ( +/- 30 days). Conditional logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between parental immigration status, parents' region of birth and time since paternal immigration, and PTSD after controlling for confounding factors. Results: The likelihood of being diagnosed with PTSD was significantly increased among children with an immigrant father (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3 - 2.4) than those with two Finnish parents and one immigrant mother. There was no significant association between having an immigrant mother or two immigrant parents and receiving a diagnosis of PTSD. The likelihood of being diagnosed with PTSD was increased if the children's fathers had migrated less than five years before their birth (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.03 - 1.9) and if their immigrant fathers had been born in North Africa or the Middle East (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4 - 3.3). Limitations: The sample included a heterogeneous migrant group without information on the reason for migration. The cases were identified from hospital diagnosis that may have only included severe cases. Conclusion: The increased likelihood of a diagnosis of PTSD underlines the need for psychosocial services among second-generation immigrants.
Subject: Post-traumatic stress disorder
Epidemiology
Immigrants
Parents
Risk factor
MENTAL-HEALTH
INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION
2ND-GENERATION IMMIGRANTS
PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS
GENDER-DIFFERENCES
VIOLENCE EXPOSURE
REFUGEE FAMILIES
CHILDREN
TRAUMA
MIGRATION
3124 Neurology and psychiatry
3112 Neurosciences
Peer reviewed: Yes
Rights: unspecified
Usage restriction: openAccess
Self-archived version: publishedVersion


Files in this item

Total number of downloads: Loading...

Files Size Format View
Parental_immigration.pdf 298.3Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record